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Mets: Why a deal for Robinson Cano actually might not be a bad idea

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SEATTLE, WA - AUGUST 20: Robinson Cano #22 of the Seattle Mariners laps the bases after hitting a three run home run to win the game 7-4 against the Houston Astros in the eighth inning during their game at Safeco Field on August 20, 2018 in Seattle, Washington. (Photo by Abbie Parr/Getty Images)
SEATTLE, WA - AUGUST 20: Robinson Cano #22 of the Seattle Mariners laps the bases after hitting a three run home run to win the game 7-4 against the Houston Astros in the eighth inning during their game at Safeco Field on August 20, 2018 in Seattle, Washington. (Photo by Abbie Parr/Getty Images)
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If the New York Mets acquire Robinson Cano, there will surely be staunch opposition from the fanbase. But with a closer look, trading for Cano actually might not be a terribly bad idea.

The first thing that comes to mind for a New York Mets fan when they that hear Robinson Cano is a candidate to be traded to the team is, “ugh… another Mets-like move… same old, same old.” In actuality, this move would incredibly beneficial and display new General Manager, Brodie Van Wagenen’s ability to think outside the box.

Granted, Cano is 36 years old and coming off a 2018 season where he missed 82 games due to suspension. Nothing is guaranteed when a player gets to the bad side of 30. But, getting a possible hall-of-farmer in Cano and young, promising talent in Edwin Diaz or Mitch Haniger, sure is enticing.

Add in the fact that the Seattle Mariners are willing to eat $10 million annually off Cano’s remaining 5 years/$120 million contract, makes this deal even more attractive. This basically means that you get two “free years” of Cano.

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People seem to forget just how good Cano is, also. He’s a career .303 hitter, who averages 24 homers per year. He hasn’t shown a lot of depreciation, either. Just two years ago, he hit 39 home runs, the most in his 14-year career and still hovers around a .300 BA over the last few seasons.

In addition, Diaz is perhaps the best closer in the MLB. In 2018, he appeared in 73 games and had 57 saves. His ERA was an excellent 1.96 and finished 8th in CY Young award voting. Diaz is only 24 years old and virtually has no ceiling — he’s the real deal.

If the deal were to include Haniger, as opposed to Diaz, it certainly would be much different, but not necessarily any worse. Haniger is also a young player who has immense potential. In 2018, he batted just under .300 and drove in 93 runs. He finished in 11th place for AL MVP.

Acquiring Cano alone would provide immediate benefit to the lineup, let alone adding in Haniger or Diaz.

Hypothetically, if the Mets agree to a deal that sends Robinson Cano and Edwin Diaz/Mitch Haniger to New York, the return to Seattle would most likely consist upon Jay Bruce, Dominic Smith, and Andres Gimenez.

Ridding themselves of Bruce’s ugly contract is a huge plus, and getting rid of Smith paves the path for hot-prospect and the future first baseman, Peter Alonso. Admittedly, losing young talent Gimenez is difficult, but not difficult enough to outweigh the immense benefits of this deal.

If this deal goes through, it would make sense for the Mets to move Jeff McNeil to third base, slot Cano in at second and either put Haniger somewhere in the outfield or make Diaz their closer, depending upon whom acquire.

Next. Mets: Trade packages teams would need to offer for Noah Syndergaard

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This is a high-risk, high-reward type of deal and would be an enormous first move for new General Manager Brodie Van Wagenen. This deal could push the Mets over the edge into contention, or perhaps, set the franchise back for years. Only time will tell what ultimately happens.

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