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Mets: What current player is deserving of the infamous “Bonilla Treatment?”

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23 Apr 1999: A close up of Bobby Bonilla #25 of the New York Mets as he looks on during warm ups before the game against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field in Chicago, Illinois. The Mets defeated the Cubs 6-5. Mandatory Credit: Jonathan Daniel /Allsport
23 Apr 1999: A close up of Bobby Bonilla #25 of the New York Mets as he looks on during warm ups before the game against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field in Chicago, Illinois. The Mets defeated the Cubs 6-5. Mandatory Credit: Jonathan Daniel /Allsport
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Today, the New York Mets are cutting Bobby Bonilla his annual check of $1,193,248.20. With the team struggling, what current player is worthy of the Bonilla treatment?

In a season where virtually everything has been going wrong, most players on the New York Mets roster are having their career-worst seasons. But nobody is having worse of a season than Jay Bruce.

Bruce, a three-time all-star, and two-time Silver Slugger Award winner has not lived up to his high expectations in any sense. That is why he is the most deserving current Mets player of the infamous “Bobby Bonilla Treatment.”

When the Mets acquired Bruce from the Cincinnati Reds in 2016, the Mets were expecting a consistent, power-hitting threat in the lineup. They got neither. Bruce has been an inconsistent, injury-riddled player.

Admittedly, Bruce did pick things up a bit towards the end of 2016 and part of 2017, but he still hasn’t lived up to his impressive track record with the Reds.

This season, Bruce has missed 18 games and is currently shelved on the Disabled List with a hip strain. His batting average is .212 and he has just three home runs.

Unfortunately, even when Bruce is healthy, he clogs up the outfield with youngsters Brandon Nimmo and Michael Conforto excelling. It gets even murkier once Yoenis Cespedes returns from his seemingly endless Disabled List stint.

The Mets are in somewhat of a bind with Bruce’s 3-year/$39 million contract. It includes a partial no-trade clause that he signed with the Mets over the recent offseason.

If the Mets were to give Bruce the “Bonilla Treatment” after the end of this season, the monetary breakdown would look something like this:

  1. Since Bruce is owed $28 million after the 2018 season, the Mets will have to defer the money.
  2. The organization would give Bruce annual payments (for 25 years) with an 8% interest rate.
  3. Starting in 2029, Bruce will be owed $5,662,872.81 until 2054.
  4. Once the 25 years are done, Bruce will end up with $141,571,820.25 by 2054. That’s a lot of money!

For me, the decision is easy.

Next: Five players you forgot the Mets drafted

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Since Bruce is owed a hefty $28 million after this season, giving him the “Bonilla Treatment” is obviously not within the realm of possibility, but still fun to play around with.

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