3 false Mets narratives about the team’s offseason and players that need to go away

Put these narratives about the Mets to rest.

Sep 27, 2023; New York City, New York, USA; New York Mets shortstop Francisco Lindor (12) reacts
Sep 27, 2023; New York City, New York, USA; New York Mets shortstop Francisco Lindor (12) reacts / Vincent Carchietta-USA TODAY Sports
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3) False: The Mets will bad contract swap with anyone

Some fans are still insistent that the Mets will always be a team willing to take on a bad contract. Well, not really. The last bad one they actually added in a trade was with the Seattle Mariners and Robinson Cano. This was under a different ownership regime. We’ve gone through multiple front office changes as well.

Whenever a contract gets ugly somewhere else, the suggestion becomes to trade the guy to the Mets. Ironic enough for Alanis Morrissette (rain on your wedding day isn’t ironic, it just sucks), the Mets have been on the other side of these trades in recent years as the ones dumping the bad contracts.

We’re still getting to know Stearns and how he’ll operate. His situation has completely changed. He has gone from the need to be a small market wunderkind to having the financial backing of a beloved owner with deep pockets. Meeting somewhere in the middle with smart moves and expensive ones when needed is the outcome we’re hoping for.

Taking on a bad contract doesn’t seem to fall into either file. It typically isn’t smart. It’s unnecessary when your team can pay for a player in free agency anyway.

While the Mets may always end up in one of these deals as the buyer of a bad contract, there’s no history of it. In other words: stop trying to dump your bad players on us.

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