How the 2 Mets prospects acquired for David Robertson performed post-deadline

The two "no names" showed some positive signs.
New York Mets v Washington Nationals
New York Mets v Washington Nationals / Rob Carr/GettyImages
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The first official trade deadline move made by the New York Mets sent closer David Robertson to the division rival Miami Marlins. In exchange, they picked up a pair of lower-level minor leaguers none of us knew a thing about. There was immediate doubt about whether or not Billy Eppler had any idea of what he was doing.

Robertson turned out to a mess for the Marlins. He was removed from the closer role shortly after putting on the turquoise Miami uniform. Although the Marlins managed to make the playoffs, it was in spite of having Robertson in the bullpen and not because of it.

Much has been made about some of the other prospects the Mets acquired at the trade deadline. What about this deal?

How Ronald Hernandez performed on the Mets farm

The lower ranked of the two prospects was 19-year-old catcher Ronald Hernandez. He was slashing .298/.464/.452 in Rookie Ball at the time of the trade. He kept it up when he joined the Mets organization.

Hernandez batted .286/.509/.486 in his 53 plate appearances for the FCL Mets. He was promoted to St. Lucie where he’d only get 39 chances to prove his worth. In the small sample size, he hit only .172/.333/.241.

Hernandez’s ability to draw walks was one of his better attributes this past season. He actually finished with three more bases on balls than strikeouts. The .452 OBP combined with all three teams is something to keep an eye on. Plate discipline like this is tough to teach.

How Marco Vargas performed on the Mets farm

The “headliner” in this deal was infielder Marco Vargas. At just 18, he did some of the same things well that Hernandez was able to accomplish. Immediately at looking through his numbers, we see he walked 53 times compared to only 38 strikeouts. This does include his time with the Marlins organization.

Specific to the Mets, he struggled a bit with the FCL Mets with a .234/.368/.298 slash line. However, he was a .308/.419/.308 hitter with St. Lucie.

Vargas only got to play in 21 games for the Mets organization, but the positive signs are there. He, along with Hernandez, are a pair to watch develop. Neither has hit for much power thus far. At such a young age, that and other positives are sure to show.

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