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NY Mets: 3 good trade deadline moves that failed in the postseason

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 01: Addison Reed #43 of the New York Mets throws a pitch against the Kansas City Royals during Game Five of the 2015 World Series at Citi Field on November 1, 2015 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 01: Addison Reed #43 of the New York Mets throws a pitch against the Kansas City Royals during Game Five of the 2015 World Series at Citi Field on November 1, 2015 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)
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New York Mets starting pitcher Kenny Rogers throws against the Houston Astros in the top of the first inning 25 August, 1999 at Shea Stadium in Flushing, NY. AFP PHOTO/Matt CAMBPELL (Photo by MATT CAMPBELL / AFP) (Photo credit should read MATT CAMPBELL/AFP via Getty Images)

I think it was Shakespeare who famously wrote, “What’s in a trade? Would a trade deadline move by any other name help the New York Mets rally and make it to the postseason?”

I am of course referring to Trevor Shakespeare, a Mets blogger who only writes in iambic pentameter.

Not all trade deadline moves work out exactly the way we envisioned. There are three moves that stand out specifically to me as effective in the regular season but not so much in the playoffs. To varying degrees, each of these players helped get the Mets to the postseason. Unfortunately, in October, they weren’t nearly as effective.

Kenny Rogers is best remembered for one bad Mets appearance in October

Kenny Rogers joined the Mets in mid-1999 following a trade with the Oakland Athletics. The veteran starter managed to go 5-1 with a 4.03 ERA in 12 starts with the Amazins. It wasn’t epic, but it did help the team clinch their first playoff berth in more than a decade.

Unfortunately, Rogers wasn’t nearly as effective in the postseason. He made one start against the Arizona Diamondbacks in the NLDS and took the loss. Rogers allowed 4 earned runs in 4.1 innings of work.

Hoping for a rebound the next time he took the hill, Rogers lost again. This time it was to the Atlanta Braves. In this outing, Rogers allowed another 4 earned runs in 5.1 innings pitched.

Rogers would get a few more innings in relief. He tossed two shutout frames in Game 5 but wasn’t so lucky in Game 6. On to pitch the 11th, Rogers gave up a leadoff double. A sacrifice bunt and two intentional walks later, the bases were loaded for Andruw Jones.

And, well, he threw one of the most infamous pitches in club history.

Rogers walked Jones with the bases loaded to send Atlanta to the 1999 World Series.

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