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NY Mets: Three worst heartbreaking pitches thrown in franchise history

KANSAS CITY, MO - OCTOBER 27: Jeurys Familia #27 of the New York Mets reacts after Alex Gordon #4 of the Kansas City Royals (not pictured) hits a solo home run in the ninth inning during Game One of the 2015 World Series at Kauffman Stadium on October 27, 2015 in Kansas City, Missouri. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)
KANSAS CITY, MO - OCTOBER 27: Jeurys Familia #27 of the New York Mets reacts after Alex Gordon #4 of the Kansas City Royals (not pictured) hits a solo home run in the ninth inning during Game One of the 2015 World Series at Kauffman Stadium on October 27, 2015 in Kansas City, Missouri. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)
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NEW YORK – OCTOBER 17: Jon Matlack #32 of the New York Mets pitches against the Oakland Athletics during game 4 of the 1973 World Series October 17, 1973 at Shea Stadium in the Queens borough of New York City. The Athletics won the series 4-3. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images)

A single swing can change the course of a season, a team, and of MLB history. The same is true for a lone pitch. Unfortunately, not every ball thrown by a New York Mets pitcher did what it was supposed to do.

In the franchise’s history, there have been some incredibly memorable catches, home runs, and walk-off victories. I’d like to dive into the darker side of Mets lore and focus on some heartache.

These three pitches delivered from the mound to home plate were supposed to go differently for the Metropolitans. Instead, they live in infamy.

Reggie Jackson has his Mets revenge in the 1973 World Series

There is a lot of history to this Mets pitch. It all began in 1966 when the Mets drafted Steve Chilcott first overall. Selected right behind him was Reggie Jackson, the future Hall of Famer.

As it has been told, the Mets didn’t draft Jackson for the most backward reason of all: his race. It’s a scar on the history of the franchise.

Jackson did have his revenge. Chilcott is known as one of the biggest draft busts of all-time while Jackson remains a legendary slugger. He got his direct revenge on the Mets in the 1973 World Series on one poor pitch from Jon Matlack.

The Miracle Mets of 1973 took the series against the Oakland Athletics all the way to Game 7. Mets starter Jon Matlack was sailing smoothly until the third inning. A two-run shot by Bert Campaneris opened up the scoring. Three batters later, Jackson put the game a little more out of reach.

With one on and two out, Jackson drove a pitch from Matlack over the outfield wall for the second two-run home run of the inning. Like that, the Athletics led 4-0. It was the last pitch Matlack threw that day.

New York went on to lose the game 5-2.

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