Fansided
New York Mets News

Mets: Was Noah Syndergaard’s off-season regimen too strong?

orangebug74
Apr 14, 2017; Miami, FL, USA; New York Mets starting pitcher Noah Syndergaard (34) throws a pitch during the fifth inning against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park. The Marlins won 3-2. Mandatory Credit: Steve Mitchell-USA TODAY Sports
Apr 14, 2017; Miami, FL, USA; New York Mets starting pitcher Noah Syndergaard (34) throws a pitch during the fifth inning against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park. The Marlins won 3-2. Mandatory Credit: Steve Mitchell-USA TODAY Sports
facebooktwitterreddit

New York Mets starter Noah Syndergaard entered camp this season saying, “I want to throw harder.”

Look, I’m not a doctor, nor did I stay in a Holiday Inn last night.  But I wonder if maybe Syndergaard’s off-season decision to bulk up and increase strength has any correlation to his present injury.

Or should I say injuries?

More from Rising Apple

He had one start scratched due to soreness in his bicep, and is now out with a partially torn right lat muscle.

Pardon my lack of expert knowledge, but that sounds like someone whom paid little attention during the off-season to his legs and core development, and wound up overthrowing with his upper body once the season started.  And why not?  He does not have an extensive follow-through which involves driving with your legs.

If anything, Syndergaard’s tendency is to complete his pitches in a somewhat upright position.  That, of course, places undue strain on the shoulder, elbow, forearm, and even lats.

A bicep… go figure.

I don’t know who signed off on such an off-season regimen.  I’m less sure who Syndergaard was trying to impress by throwing 99 mph in March.

I began expressing my concern about this matter in our season previews, saying, “Thor has never experienced Tommy John surgery, and just might be feeling a little too invincible for his own good.”

If he wanted to improve his durability and longevity, fine.

Throwing harder?  Complete folly.  That’s just not the way it works.

I was taught pitchers should be limber, loose, flexible, pliable even.  Bigger biceps might look nice on the beach — especially with that lovely blonde mane of his.  But on a mound, bigger muscles do more to hinder a pitcher’s full range of motion than anything else.

I would have suggested he simply try throwing smarter.

Furthermore, I’m a little dumbfounded about how much sway Syndergaard thinks he wields by declining the team’s first suggestion for an MRI.

Look at you now!

The Mets letting him slide, then allowing him to start another game are completely different matters.

Next: Mets bad luck… or is it poor decisions?

For what it’s worth, the team says there is no time-table for his return.

Great …

facebooktwitterreddit