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NY Mets: The Robinson Cano “spin” nobody wants to deal with

Sep 29, 2019; New York City, NY, USA; New York Mets second basemen Robinson Cano (24) waves to the crowd after being taken out in the sixth inning against the Atlanta Braves at Citi Field. Mandatory Credit: Wendell Cruz-USA TODAY Sports
Sep 29, 2019; New York City, NY, USA; New York Mets second basemen Robinson Cano (24) waves to the crowd after being taken out in the sixth inning against the Atlanta Braves at Citi Field. Mandatory Credit: Wendell Cruz-USA TODAY Sports
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It’s like acquiring a player at the trade deadline! This way of thinking has become clichéd midseason whenever a guy returns from an injury around late July. Lambasted this past year with the return of Carlos Carrasco to the New York Mets, there’s another guy who could fit into a similar narrative this winter.

Robinson Cano missed all of 2021 due to a 162 game suspension. A second failed PED test, his first with the Mets, gave the team an open roster spot and a way to look at life after his contract finally runs out.

While many of us were hoping the Mets would simply release Cano when he was eligible to return, it doesn’t seem to be the case. The Mets are gearing up for a season with Cano on the roster, at the plate, and maybe even in the field.

However much he plays, we really don’t need to hear about how his return is like a free agent addition.

The Mets can spin it however they want, Robinson Cano is an ill-fit for the 2022 season

There was never really a need to acquire Cano in the first place. Back in 2018, Jeff McNeil looked like he would man second base for a good decade or so.

Those who were unhappy with Cano’s arrival to New York were satisfied knowing they were right. He was pitiful in 2019.

Then came the 2020 season. The shortened campaign saw a different side of Cano. He actually hit amazingly well. Maybe there was something left in the tank. Perhaps there was. Unfortunately, we’ll never know how legitimate any of it was because Cano was busted with a failed PED test in November.

Cano is not someone I look forward to seeing play baseball in 2022. He kind of lost my respect a little more when he repeated his mistake of breaking the rules. It’s one thing to make a major mistake like take PEDs once, get busted, and learn from it.

As a veteran, a proclaimed leader in the locker room, it’s embarrassing to have a guy looking for so many shortcuts.

Cano could have a positive impact on the team behind the scenes. However, his presence can drag the team down in other ways. Because of his large contract, the Mets front office may be held back from making certain moves. It’s a travesty.

Weeks or maybe months from now, someone from the Mets PR team is going to pump up the return of Cano. It’ll be sad. It’ll be soul-wrenching. I might even blush and pity the person who has to try to convince a fan base that this is a good thing.

Next. 3 depth pieces that didn't work out for the 2021 Mets

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Certain players serve us best by fading away. As unceremonious of an ending as it would be, the Mets would be much better off without thinking of him as a free agent signing and more like some bait to cut.

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