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NY Mets Monday Morning GM: Francisco Lindor and signer’s remorse

Sep 8, 2021; Miami, Florida, USA; New York Mets short stop Francisco Lindor (12) sits in the dugout against the Miami Marlins during the first inning at loanDepot Park Mandatory Credit: Rhona Wise-USA TODAY Sports
Sep 8, 2021; Miami, Florida, USA; New York Mets short stop Francisco Lindor (12) sits in the dugout against the Miami Marlins during the first inning at loanDepot Park Mandatory Credit: Rhona Wise-USA TODAY Sports
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Apr 18, 2021; Denver, Colorado, USA; New York Mets shortstop Francisco Lindor (12) throws the ball into the stands in the fifth inning against the Colorado Rockies at Coors Field. Mandatory Credit: Isaiah J. Downing-USA TODAY Sports

Francisco Lindor didn’t choose the Mets but then he grabbed the money

We can look back at what led to the start of this relationship. Lindor was traded to the Mets, against his will. He didn’t come kicking and screaming. He seemed happy to get out of the situation the Cleveland Indians had dug themselves into.

Lindor quickly set a deadline for an extension. It was Opening Day or the end of the season. He wouldn’t listen to offers in the regular season.

The front office did the right thing. Was it the smart thing? Definitely not. After the season he has put together, Lindor would have needed to sign for much less. It would have still been an immensely large deal but certainly not as lucrative as it ended up.

I’m always curious about the psyche that goes on for athletes. Do they bet on themselves or do they take the money and hope they can at least put up a passable performance?

There was no way Lindor could logically bet on himself to have a good year in 2021. How many more millions would an MVP have gotten him? I think he got every penny he probably ever could.

I don’t like referencing Lindor’s paycheck as a reason to hold him to a higher standard. I lump him in with other veterans making good money. I am not opposed to holding him a bit more accountable than someone making as much in one year as he will in a month, though. With big contracts come even larger responsibilities.

Nobody—the Mets or Lindor—is at fault for the contract taking place. It was the best move either could do. Someone was likely to lose in the end.

Lindor may fall asleep at night wishing he was playing on a coastal town with adoring fans who never boo. It’s only natural for thoughts of “what if” to pop up.

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