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NY Mets: 2 one-year free agent contracts that have worked out perfectly

PITTSBURGH, PA - JULY 18: A detailed view of the Stance Socks and Under Armour Cleats worn by Brandon Nimmo #9 of the New York Mets during the game against the Pittsburgh Pirates at PNC Park on July 18, 2021 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Justin Berl/Getty Images)
PITTSBURGH, PA - JULY 18: A detailed view of the Stance Socks and Under Armour Cleats worn by Brandon Nimmo #9 of the New York Mets during the game against the Pittsburgh Pirates at PNC Park on July 18, 2021 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Justin Berl/Getty Images)
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NEW YORK, NY – SEPTEMBER 20: Pitcher Rick Porcello #22 of the New York Mets pitches in an MLB baseball game against the Atlanta Braves on September 20, 2020 at Citi Field in the Queens borough of New York City. Braves won 7-0. (Photo by Paul Bereswill/Getty Images)

Got fear of commitment? In some instances of a one-year contract, a lack of commitment from the player or management is the result of this fear. Players are trying to raise their stock and cash in the following year. Members of the front office don’t want to get stuck with an albatross. The New York Mets made a pair of moves that fit this profile over the winter. Each has worked to perfection.

Mets one-year contracts have worked out much better this year than last

Before the 2020 season, the Mets made two key winter acquisitions that brought players to Flushing on one-year deals. They signed free agent pitchers Rick Porcello and Michael Wacha to deals that were clearly meant to give them an opportunity to reclaim their reputation.

Things couldn’t have been much worse for either. Porcello was 1-7 with a 5.64 ERA in a dozen starts. Wacha was 1-4 with a 6.62 ERA in 7 starts and a relief appearance.

Neither recovered well after their lone season with the Mets. Porcello went unsigned and didn’t throw a professional pitch all 2021-year-long. Wacha did end up with the Tampa Bay Rays on a fresh one-year contract. Unfortunately for him, the season has gone nearly as bad with an ERA in the high 5.00s as he nears 100 innings pitched.

Unafraid to take a chance on players willing to accept one-year deals last winter, the new regime got much different results from the two veterans they picked up this offseason for a single season. In fact, you could argue both have helped hold the team together through thick and thin.

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