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New York Mets All-Time Lists

NY Mets: 5 all-time worst offenses in franchise history

Sep 20, 2017; Miami, FL, USA; A detailed view of the bat and shoes of New York Mets shortstop Jose Reyes (7) as he sits in the dugout between inning against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park. Mandatory Credit: Jasen Vinlove-USA TODAY Sports
Sep 20, 2017; Miami, FL, USA; A detailed view of the bat and shoes of New York Mets shortstop Jose Reyes (7) as he sits in the dugout between inning against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park. Mandatory Credit: Jasen Vinlove-USA TODAY Sports
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FLUSHING, NY – 1965: Outfielder Willie Mays #24 (left) and firstbaseman Willie McCovey #44 (right) of the San Francisco Giants flank rookie outfielder Ron Swoboda #14 of the New York Mets as they pose for a portrait prior to a game in 1965 at Shea Stadium in Flushing, New York. (Photo by: Kidwiler Collection/Diamond Images/Getty Images)

2) Worst Mets offense: 1965

The 1965 Mets have the honor of holding the worst on-base percentage of any Mets team at a startlingly low .277 OBP. That’s a lower percentage than the offensively gifted 1999 Mets hit as a batting average (.279 AVG).

The Amazin’s were in their fourth season and continued their steady grip on last place in the National League, finishing in 10th for the fourth season in a row.

Again Ed Kranepool led the Mets on offense, hitting a team-high .253 AVG and 24 doubles to make his only All-Star appearance at the young age of 20.

Outside of Kranepool, none of the other Mets could consistently get on base. The team finished last in the National League in runs, hits, stolen bases, batting average, and slugging percentage.

Both before and after aging manager Casey Stengel was forced to retire after breaking his hip, the Mets struggled. Under both Stengel and replacement manager Wes Westrum, the team failed to win a third of their games.

Their 112 loss season finishes as the second-most in team history, finishing only behind the team’s inaugural season in 1962.

If the goal in baseball were to record 27 outs as quickly as possible, these Mets would have been some of the greatest to ever play the game.

In reality, it’s quite the opposite.

How could it get any worse than this?

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