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New York Mets All-Time Lists

NY Mets: 5 all-time worst offenses in franchise history

Sep 20, 2017; Miami, FL, USA; A detailed view of the bat and shoes of New York Mets shortstop Jose Reyes (7) as he sits in the dugout between inning against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park. Mandatory Credit: Jasen Vinlove-USA TODAY Sports
Sep 20, 2017; Miami, FL, USA; A detailed view of the bat and shoes of New York Mets shortstop Jose Reyes (7) as he sits in the dugout between inning against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park. Mandatory Credit: Jasen Vinlove-USA TODAY Sports
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NEW YORK – CIRCA 1981: Rusty Staub #10 of the New York Mets bats during an Major League Baseball game circa 1981 at Shea Stadium in the Queens borough of New York City. Staub played for the Mets from 1972-75 and 1981-85. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images)

3) Worst Mets offense: 1972

The only entry on this list to come from outside of the 60s, the 1972 Mets are the most recent addition on this list. So just remember that the Mets may be bad now, but they have been far from their worst for a while now.

It may not feel like it most of the time, but looking back, it’s true.

In Yogi Berra’s first season as manager in Queens, the team struggled mightily on the offensive end. The ’72 Amazin’s rank as one of the worst offensive units that the franchise has ever seen, ranking as the 6th worst season in runs per game (3.38) and third-worst in hits per game (7.40).

The team struggled to make consistent contact, hitting just a .225 AVG (third-worst in team history) and a .639 OPS (fifth-worst).

Only Ed Kranepool managed to hit above a .250 AVG, hitting a fairly uninspiring .269 AVG to lead the team.

New York’s record was kept afloat but the defense, helping them to third in the NL East with an 83-73 record despite having the worst batting average in the National League.

With Seaver, Jon Matlack, and Jim McAndrew tallying sub-3.00 ERA seasons, the 1972 Mets are another case of strong pitching let down by abysmal offense.

It reminds me of the titular song from the 1991 Disney classic Beauty and the Beast.

"“Tale as old as time Song as old as rhyme Beauty and the Beast”"

The Mets defense and offense’s relationship couldn’t be described any better.

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