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New York Mets All-Time Lists

NY Mets: 5 all-time worst offenses in franchise history

Sep 20, 2017; Miami, FL, USA; A detailed view of the bat and shoes of New York Mets shortstop Jose Reyes (7) as he sits in the dugout between inning against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park. Mandatory Credit: Jasen Vinlove-USA TODAY Sports
Sep 20, 2017; Miami, FL, USA; A detailed view of the bat and shoes of New York Mets shortstop Jose Reyes (7) as he sits in the dugout between inning against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park. Mandatory Credit: Jasen Vinlove-USA TODAY Sports
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NEW YORK – CIRCA 1969: Manager Gil Hodges #14 of the New York Mets talks with a player prior to the start of a Major League Baseball game circa 1969 at Shea Stadium in the Queens borough of New York City. Hodges managed the Mets from 1968-71. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images)

4) Worst Mets offense: 1967

The youngest Mets team in history with an average batter age of 25.8 years old, the 1967 Amazin’s were beginning to show signs of becoming the team that would win the World Series two years later.

Tom Seaver dominated on the mound with 18 complete games and 170 strikeouts on his way to the NL Rookie of the Year award, quickly becoming the franchise’s first and brightest superstar.

Lefty and future World Series champion Jerry Koosman also had an outstanding season, finishing with a 2.08 ERA and a 19-12 record.

Sadly, much like the Mets of today, the offense couldn’t back up their strong pitching staff. Some things will never change

The 1967 Mets would finish last in the National League for the fifth time in six seasons, ranking last in runs and on-base percentage and second to last in batting average, home runs, and runners left on base.

It says something about how bad the franchise have been that this season comes in at number four on this list.

Manager Wes Westrum was fired 151 games into the season, with Salty Parker finishing the season as interim manager. Their rough ’67 season would lead to the offseason hiring of future World Champion Gil Hodges.

The Amazin’s were led by left fielder Tommy Davis, who had won the 1963 World Series with the Los Angeles Dodgers. Davis lead the team in home runs (16), RBIs (73), and batting average (.302 AVG).

The two-time batting title winner would leave the Mets for the White Sox prior to the 1968 season, leaving a massive hole in the lineup (more on that later).

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