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New York Mets All-Time Lists

NY Mets: 5 all-time worst offenses in franchise history

Sep 20, 2017; Miami, FL, USA; A detailed view of the bat and shoes of New York Mets shortstop Jose Reyes (7) as he sits in the dugout between inning against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park. Mandatory Credit: Jasen Vinlove-USA TODAY Sports
Sep 20, 2017; Miami, FL, USA; A detailed view of the bat and shoes of New York Mets shortstop Jose Reyes (7) as he sits in the dugout between inning against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park. Mandatory Credit: Jasen Vinlove-USA TODAY Sports
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FLUSHING, NY – 1964 : Manager Casey Stengel of the New York Mets hams it up with foreign fans of the Mets while introducing them to a ballpark staple, the hotdog prior to a 1964 season game at Shea Stadium in Flushing, New York. (Photo by: Olen Collection/Diamond Images/Getty Images)

The New York Mets get bullied a lot for being a bad team. The butt of many jokes, Queens has not always been home to the most talented baseball outfits.

It feels like for every Pete Alonso rookie season, the Amazin’s have had three batters below the Mendoza line.

Not every team has been bad though, whether it be in 1999 or 2015, the Mets have had some great offenses in the past. However, we won’t be talking about those teams today.

It’s time to take a look at the worst of the worst, the opposite of the cream of the crop: The 5 worst offenses in Mets history.

5) Worst Mets offense: 1963

The young New York franchise had a very, very tough time prior to their stunning World Series win in 1969. Since their inception in 1962 to 1968, the Mets failed to finish higher than ninth out of 10 teams in the National League and winning just 34.7% of their games.

Their second season was no exception. Finishing 51-111 and last in the National League, The 1963 Mets hit .219 AVG, the worst ever in team history.

They still managed runs, outhitting the 9th place Houston Colt .45s to finish 9th in the NL with 501 runs scored.

40 different batters made plate appearances for the Mets in what was a horrendous and disjointed offense.

Only six Mets made enough plate appearances to qualify for the league batting leaders that season. Out of those six, only Ron Hunt (.272 AVG) and Frank Thomas (.260) were able to hit above a .250 AVG.

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