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NY Mets: 15 worst trade deadline deals in franchise history

NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 03: Jose Reyes #7 of the New York Mets celebrates the win with teammates Neil Walker #20,Asdrubal Cabrera #13,Jay Bruce #19, Curtis Granderson #3 and Yoenis Cespedes #52 after the game against the Atlanta Braves during Opening Day on April 3, 2017 at Citi Field in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City.The New York Mets defeated the 6-0. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 03: Jose Reyes #7 of the New York Mets celebrates the win with teammates Neil Walker #20,Asdrubal Cabrera #13,Jay Bruce #19, Curtis Granderson #3 and Yoenis Cespedes #52 after the game against the Atlanta Braves during Opening Day on April 3, 2017 at Citi Field in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City.The New York Mets defeated the 6-0. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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1989: Mookie Wilson of the New York Mets swings during a game in the 1989 season. (Photo by: Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

The trade deadline has one main purpose: give teams an opportunity to improve their ball club. Whether buying or selling, the ultimate mission is to get better. Buyers look short-term while sellers hope to get better in the future. The New York Mets, who have swung some major trade deadline deals in their history, have their share of hits and misses.

Previously on Rising Apple back when I was a wee tyke at FanSided, I covered the top 15 trade deadline deals in Mets history. In the time since, I have wanted to look at the other side: the worst trades the Mets have made at the deadline.

Finally, in a year where we’re more positive than ever, I have set aside the time to do it. These Mets trades at the deadline are a mix of forgettable and infamous. None gave the club the rewards they were hoping for whether it brought them little back in terms of prospects or brought them a dud major leaguer.

15) NY Mets Worst Trade Deadline Moves: Mookie Wilson to the Blue Jays for Jeff Musselman

The only time I trust a trade for a guy with the last name Musselman is if I’m trying to find a personal trainer. On July 31, 1989, the Mets were looking for something else. Although competitive, the team used this summer to move away from the spectacular platoon that had worked for several seasons in center field and go in a new direction.

Right on July 31, the Mets traded longtime fan favorite Mookie Wilson to the Toronto Blue Jays for pitcher Jeff Musselman and a lifetime minor leaguer, Mike Brady. Wilson, who was set to become a free agent at season’s end, was hitting just .205 at the time of the trade. It made a lot of sense to move on from him.

Unfortunately, Wilson found success with his new ball club. Outside of New York for the first time in his professional career, Wilson hit .298 for the Blue Jays in 1989. He ended up re-signing with them in the offseason and played north of the border into the 1991 campaign.

As with any trade, there are two sides. You already know Brady never made the majors. Musselman, who was pitching to a 10.64 ERA at the time of the deal, turned things around for the Mets in 1989. He logged 26.1 innings and gave them a 3.08 ERA. That was about all he could give them. In 1990, he pitched 32 frames and had a 5.63 ERA. He wouldn’t pitch in the big leagues again.

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