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Mets Top Prospects: Three guys we’re eager to see play their first full professional season

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - JULY 19: A detailed view of the bat wieghts of the New York Mets in the on-deck circle against the San Francisco Giants at Oracle Park on July 19, 2019 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - JULY 19: A detailed view of the bat wieghts of the New York Mets in the on-deck circle against the San Francisco Giants at Oracle Park on July 19, 2019 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)
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NEW YORK, NEW YORK – APRIL 14: Detail of the Nike shoes worn by Pete Alonso #20 of the New York Mets during the first inning against the Philadelphia Phillies at Citi Field on April 14, 2021 in the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Sarah Stier/Getty Images)

Minor league baseball returns to action this year after a layoff in 2020 because of the global pandemic. Resuming minor league ball across the country means a chance to take a look at some future members of the New York Mets. Amazingly, many of the club’s best prospects have yet to even play a full professional season.

The Mets farm system has few guys that are a stone’s throw away from a major league debut. After trading away several key pieces in recent years, we’re in the waiting phase.

Because the 2019 MLB Draft took place midseason and the 2020 one didn’t include any games after, there are two draft classes that have yet to experience what we could call a full professional season. These three Mets prospects are well-hyped and we should all be eager to see what they can accomplish in their first full season. Although 2021 might be a little shorter than most, they’ll give us far more innings and at-bats than they have already.

Mets top pitching prospect Matthew Allan has only a handful of professional innings

It’s not often the best pitching prospect in a team’s farm system is a third-round pick from only two years ago with just 10.1 innings of professional work on his resume. Let’s recall how the Mets landed Matthew Allan in the first place.

Way back in 2019 when Brodie Van Wagenen was calling the shots, the Mets selected nothing but college players after taking Allan in the third round. This allowed them to bolster their signing bonus to him, convincing the kid to skip college and come straight to the pro ranks.

Allan did pitch a little bit after he was drafted. His 8.1 innings in the Gulf Coast League resulted in a 1.08 ERA and a strikeout rate of 11.9. He wasn’t as lucky in his two innings in the New York Penn League—one level higher. However, it was two innings where he allowed as many runs in them.

The Mets built a good chunk of their 2019 draft strategy around signing Allan. A year off from playing actual games, it will be interesting to see how this may affect him.

If there is one prospect in the system you could expect to make a huge leap this season, I think it’s Allan. Teams always need pitching. While I don’t predict a major league debut just yet, Allan could put himself in a position to at least compete for a gig with the Mets in spring of 2022.

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