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New York Mets prospects

Three Mets prospects who could find themselves in the rotation this season

BALTIMORE, MD - SEPTEMBER 01: Franklyn Kilome #66 of the New York Mets pitches against the Baltimore Orioles at Oriole Park at Camden Yards on September 1, 2020 in Baltimore, Maryland. (Photo by G Fiume/Getty Images)
BALTIMORE, MD - SEPTEMBER 01: Franklyn Kilome #66 of the New York Mets pitches against the Baltimore Orioles at Oriole Park at Camden Yards on September 1, 2020 in Baltimore, Maryland. (Photo by G Fiume/Getty Images)
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BOSTON, MA – SEPTEMBER 15: A detailed view of the ball bag for the New York Mets sits by the dugout before a game against the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park on September 15, 2018 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Adam Glanzman/Getty Images)

The New York Mets have pitching depth at the major league and minor league levels. A mix of youngsters, veterans, and castoffs from other organizations, there’s no shortage of arms we could see enter the rotation at any point this season.

Today, I’d like to look at a few of the notable prospects we could see join the rotation at some point in 2021. To be considered a prospect, they’ll still need their rookie status intact.

Who are these three pitchers and how likely is it that we’ll see them enter the rotation? You’ll have to tune in right below for the answer.

Thomas Szapucki – Mets number 9 prospect per MLB.com

There’s little doubt we’ll see Thomas Szapucki pitch for the Mets at some point in 2021. Outside of a trade before making his debut with the club, the 24-year-old lefty is one of the longest-tenured highly-rated prospects in the organization.

Szapucki might be a little behind schedule in part because of injuries. He made only six starts in 2017 and missed all of 2018. When he returned to action in 2019, Szapucki logged just over 60 innings. The result was a 2.63 ERA with an average of 10.5 strikeouts per nine.

Last year was a wash for all minor leaguers which put his progress on hold. This year, if all goes well for the number nine ranked prospect in the system, he could become a candidate to join the rotation.

The likelihood of this is still not too great as he has yet to even pitch at the Triple-A level. For two positives, he’s already on the 40-man roster and throws left-handed. These two put him in line as a candidate to put “major league pitcher” on next year’s tax returns. Still, I think I’d put him behind our second guest on this list.

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