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Mets players on the hot seat heading into the 2021 season

JUPITER, FLORIDA - MARCH 01: J.D. Davis #28 of the New York Mets in the third inning against the Miami Marlins in a spring training game at Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium on March 01, 2021 in Jupiter, Florida. (Photo by Mark Brown/Getty Images)
JUPITER, FLORIDA - MARCH 01: J.D. Davis #28 of the New York Mets in the third inning against the Miami Marlins in a spring training game at Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium on March 01, 2021 in Jupiter, Florida. (Photo by Mark Brown/Getty Images)
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NEW YORK, NEW YORK – AUGUST 12: Robert Gsellman #65 of the New York Mets delivers the pitch against the Washington Nationals at Citi Field on August 12, 2020 in New York City. (Photo by Steven Ryan/Getty Images)

2) Right-handed pitcher Robert Gsellman

In what seems like an eternity since Robert Gsellman’s Major League debut back in 2016, in which he produced a 2.42 ERA over eight appearances (seven starts), he had many believing he was the next great arm to come out of the Mets Minor League pipeline. Unfortunately, inconsistencies since 2017 have poured cold water on those expectations and Gsellman, comes into the 2021 season in a critical spot in which he needs to deliver better performances on the mound or he could be on the outside looking in this season.

Gsellman was tendered a contract by the Mets this offseason at $1.3 million which confused many fans due to his forgettable 2020 campaign. Gsellman was ultimately given another shot at joining the starting rotation, which is something he has long campaigned for, and he largely struggled when the Mets were desperate for starting pitching help.

It’s also important to remember that both Gsellman and Team President Sandy Alderson had an ugly spat within the media back in 2017 after Gsellman irritated then General Manager Sandy Alderson by saying “I don’t care” when Alderson had spoken to reporters about Gsellman’s recent performance and needing Gsellman to pitch better.

A big reason Gsellman was brought back was due to the fact he has one minor league option remaining which gives the Mets some roster flexibility if the 27-year old right-hander stumbles out of the gates. However, with only one more arbitration-eligible year before Gsellman reaches free agency, he could find himself in his final rodeo and a potential non-tender candidate next season with the only organization he has ever known, if the Mets don’t see any improvement this upcoming season.

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