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New York Mets History

NY Mets: The three Braves players that I despise the most

ATLANTA, GEORGIA - OCTOBER 03: Former Atlanta Braves player Chipper Jones shakes hands with Freddie Freeman #5 of the Atlanta Braves after throwing out the ceremonial first pitch prior to game one of the National League Division Series between the Atlanta Braves and the St. Louis Cardinals at SunTrust Park on October 03, 2019 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Todd Kirkland/Getty Images)
ATLANTA, GEORGIA - OCTOBER 03: Former Atlanta Braves player Chipper Jones shakes hands with Freddie Freeman #5 of the Atlanta Braves after throwing out the ceremonial first pitch prior to game one of the National League Division Series between the Atlanta Braves and the St. Louis Cardinals at SunTrust Park on October 03, 2019 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Todd Kirkland/Getty Images)
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NEW YORK, NY – SEPTEMBER 09: Chipper Jones #10 of the Atlanta Braves acknowledges the appluase of the crowd after his last at bat ever in Citi Field against the New York Mets at Citi Field on September 9, 2012 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Andy Marlin/AM Photography/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY – SEPTEMBER 09: Chipper Jones #10 of the Atlanta Braves acknowledges the appluase of the crowd after his last at bat ever in Citi Field against the New York Mets at Citi Field on September 9, 2012 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Andy Marlin/AM Photography/Getty Images)

Chipper Jones

Everybody who is a Mets fan knew Larry would make his way onto this list and that he would be on this list. While I hated him, I am too young to hate him more than the current ultimate Met killer in Freddie Freeman. Chipper Jones tormented the Mets in his entire 19-year career which was spent exclusively in Atlanta. He enjoyed playing the Mets so much, he named his son Shea, after Shea Stadium; the ballpark he owned.

In his career against the Mets, Chipper slashed .309/.406/.543 with 49 home runs and 159 RBI. At Shea Stadium, he slashed .313/.407/.557 with 19 home runs and 55 RBI. These numbers at Shea were his best at an opposing team’s stadium.

While I hated his guts, I can also say I sort of miss Chipper. I miss the crowd chanting “Larry!” at him. Though what I do not miss is the countless clutch hits he had at the Mets’ expense.

While I am too young to have a lot of memories of Chipper haunting the Mets in the ’90s and early 2000s, there are still some moments that come to mind for me.

The one I think about the most was actually his last game in New York. I was in attendance at Citi Field in September of 2012, and I remember wanting to boo, but everyone else was giving him a round of applause, so I did too.

Looking back at it now, I understand why they did that. He was the ultimate Met killer, but he is someone I’ve learned to respect. While I respect him, I certainly do not like him.

Chipper is the all-time leader in pretty much every offensive statistical category in the Mets-Braves rivalry. Everything from games to hits, to home runs, he has a massive lead in just about every category and that will likely stay that way for a very long time.

WASHINGTON, DC – SEPTEMBER 10: Craig Kimbrel #46 of the Atlanta Braves pitches to a Washington Nationals batter in the ninth inning during a game at Nationals Park on September 10, 2014 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Patrick McDermott/Washington Nationals/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC – SEPTEMBER 10: Craig Kimbrel #46 of the Atlanta Braves pitches to a Washington Nationals batter in the ninth inning during a game at Nationals Park on September 10, 2014 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Patrick McDermott/Washington Nationals/Getty Images)

Craig Kimbrel

For this third spot, I had no idea who to choose. I could’ve chosen an older pitcher like John Smoltz or Tom Glavine or I could’ve chosen current Met nemesis Ronald Acuna Jr. Acuna has obliterated the Mets and was going to be my choice but then I came up with the conclusion that he has not played enough yet so I gave him a pass.

Then after more thinking, it finally came to me. The one pitcher I never wanted to see was Craig Kimbrel. In his prime, when Kimbrel came into the game it was basically over. He has that weird motion with his arms out sort of like a bird, and then comes set and fires 99 mph fastballs by any Met hitter or a devastating breaking pitch.

Kimbrel in his prime was borderline untouchable. He was the most feared closer I have ever witnessed. In his career against the Mets, Kimbrel has gone 1-0 with a 1.43 ERA, striking out 50 in 32 innings pitched, a 14.1 K/9.

It seemed like every game against Kimbrel went the same way. He had such unbelievable stuff but control was sometimes an issue with him. So he would walk a batter or two and give me some hope, but then would strike out the side and nail down a save.

Kimbrel was so dominant and rarely blew saves but one that I do remember against the Mets happened in 2013. The Mets were down 5-4 in the ninth and David Wright hit a long home run to dead center off Kimbrel to tie the game. The Mets would go on to win that game making me a happy kid.

That one moment was sandwiched between utter dominance Kimbrel has had against the Mets. He has 26 saves in 27 career tries against the Mets, the Wright home run was the only blemish in Kimbrel’s record against the Mets.

Next. My most hated Nationals players of all-time

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When he was traded to San Diego in 2015 I was thrilled and when he later went on to Boston and out of the National League I was even more thrilled. Now Kimbrel is not very good anymore, but I still hope to never see him again.

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