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New York Mets All-Time Lists

Best Mets who have had two tours with the orange and blue

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FLUSHING, NY - 1983: Tom Seaver of the New York Mets delivers a pitch during a game in 1983 at Shea Stadium in Flushing, Quenns, New York. (Photo by Rich Pilling/MLB Photos via Getty Images)
FLUSHING, NY - 1983: Tom Seaver of the New York Mets delivers a pitch during a game in 1983 at Shea Stadium in Flushing, Quenns, New York. (Photo by Rich Pilling/MLB Photos via Getty Images)
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25 Jul 1993: Infielder Bobby Bonilla of the New York Mets in action during a game against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California. Mandatory Credit: Stephen Dunn /Allsport

Mets Third Basemen

Third base was forever the revolving door for the Mets…until, of course, came the arrival of some guy named David Wright. But a couple of well-known names in Mets history, one that remains in infamy, were returnees through that revolving door.

Hubie Brooks (39, 7) was devastated and downright angry when included in the Gary Carter trade that sent him to Montreal prior to the 1985 season. He actually was moved to shortstop from third base during the 1984 season, to make room for Howard Johnson, but, in reality, was being showcased for the Expos to show he could play the position.

Brooks was a star shortstop at Arizona State when he was drafted by the Mets. After some productive years with the Expos, he went on to become a power-hitting outfielder with the Dodgers before returning to the Mets for the 1991 season at the age of 34. He moved on right after that to finish out his career elsewhere.

Bobby Bonilla (25) is probably one of the most hated players in Mets history, if not the most vilified. Probably because his attitude sucked and he is STILL being paid after all of these years. Bonilla left Pittsburgh where he was playing second fiddle to Barry Bonds prior to the 1992 season.

The early to mid 90’s was a bizarre time period for the Mets. The team actually spent money but obviously didn’t spend it wisely. They bought big names, but also bought big attitudes. Big BAD attitudes. Whether Bonilla was a victim of it or he was another that played a part in that insanity, he was finally shipped off to Baltimore during the 1995 season for some prospects.

As if they needed it to be reinforced that he had worn out his welcome, the Mets brought him back for the 1999 campaign for a mere 60 games and a lot more “booing.”

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