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MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN - AUGUST 03: Carlos Rodon #55 of the Chicago White Sox pitches in the second inning against the Milwaukee Brewers at Miller Park on August 03, 2020 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images)
MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN - AUGUST 03: Carlos Rodon #55 of the Chicago White Sox pitches in the second inning against the Milwaukee Brewers at Miller Park on August 03, 2020 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images)
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CLEVELAND, OHIO – JULY 28: Starting pitcher Carlos Rodon #55 of the Chicago White Sox leaves the game during the fourth inning of game 2 of a double header against the Cleveland Indians at Progressive Field on July 28, 2020 in Cleveland, Ohio. The Indians defeated the White Sox 5-3 in game 2 of a double header. (Photo by Jason Miller/Getty Images)

The Mets are still trying to build out their rotation and offering Carlos Rodon a minor-league deal could prove to be valuable down the road

The New York Mets certainly don’t need more question marks in the rotation, but there’s also no risk in providing potential depth, especially at a low cost. A pitcher like Carlos Rodon could be the type of low-risk/high-reward that ends up providing value for the club.

For Rodon, it’s never been a potential of question, but rather of putting it all together. Drafted with the third overall pick in the 2014 MLB draft, Rodon came into the White Sox organization with high expectations. Throwing a mid 90s fastball, a slider, and changeup, Rodon was known for missing bats. Racking up a K/9 ratio of almost 13 in college, the White Sox expected more of the same in Chicago.

Unfortunately, since getting to the Majors, Rodon has been plagued by inconsistency and injuries. Since coming into the league in 2015, Rodon’s ERA has gone up every season and culminated last year with an 8.22, although he only threw seven innings over the whole season. Taking this into account, people are probably wondering why he should even be considered an option.

The natural stuff is there and if you take a look at his small sample size in 2019, there’s a reason to be somewhat optimistic. His strikeout numbers were up, whiffing 46 batters in 34 innings. Yes, it’s a limited sample, but it indicates that the swing and miss stuff is still very much there.

Additionally, the seasons in which Rodon’s ERA has ballooned are seasons in which he has faced injuries and had his year cut short. In the three seasons he’s thrown over 100 innings, his ERA consisted of 3.75, 4.04 and 4.18 respectively. This is a drastic difference from the 5.19 and 8.22 ERAs he posted in injury-laden seasons.

Rodon is certainly no sure thing. Between the injuries, the walks (career 3.87 BB/9) and the 4.26 FIP over six seasons, there’s certainly a reason for suitors to approach cautiously. That being said, given the high strikeout potential and friendly confines of Citi Field, the Mets should at least consider bringing Rodon to spring training on a minor-league deal.

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