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Mets News: The loss of a legend, saying goodbye to Tom Seaver

NEW YORK - APRIL 13: Former Mets players Mike Piazza and Tom Seaver greet fans before throwing out the first pitch of the San Diego Padres against the New York Mets during opening day at Citi Field on April 13, 2009 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. This is the first regular season MLB game being played at the new venue which replaced Shea stadium as the Mets home field. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
NEW YORK - APRIL 13: Former Mets players Mike Piazza and Tom Seaver greet fans before throwing out the first pitch of the San Diego Padres against the New York Mets during opening day at Citi Field on April 13, 2009 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. This is the first regular season MLB game being played at the new venue which replaced Shea stadium as the Mets home field. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
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The New York Mets and Major League Baseball lost a legend Wednesday night, as Tom Seaver passed away at the age of 75.

The one they called “Tom Terrific” and “The Franchise”, Tom Seaver, will forever be remembered as the greatest member of the New York Mets of all time. His death comes after a battle with Lewy body dementia and COVID-19, according to TMZ. He is the franchise’s all-time leader in almost every major pitching statistic including wins, ERA, and strikeouts.

Seaver leaves behind a legacy full of Amazin’ memories that will never be forgotten. He announced his presence right away in 1967, taking home Rookie of the Year honors and making his first of 12 All-Star appearances, 11 of which came with the Mets.  Seaver was a dominant force on the mound for the Mets until before being unthinkably traded to the Cincinnati Reds in 1977.

The Seaver trade is remembered by many as one of the darkest days in Mets franchise history. To many Mets fans’ delight, Seaver returned to Queens for one season in 1983, before leaving again, this time for the Chicago White Sox.

“Tom Terrific” was the first star the franchise ever had, following their expansion in 1962. He took on the bright lights of New York City full force, turning the Mets from lovable losers, into World Series Champions.

Across 20  Major League seasons, the hard-throwing righty would amass 311 wins and 3,640 strikeouts, while also adding three Cy Young Awards to his mantle. As a member of the Reds in 1978, he threw the first and only no-hitter of his Major League career.

In 1988, Seaver became the first player to have his number (41) retired by the Mets.  Four years later, he was elected into the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame, receiving 98.4 percent of the votes. Only Mariano Rivera, Derek Jeter, and Ken Griffey Jr. have received a higher percentage.

After his playing days, Seaver enjoyed a lengthy broadcasting career as an analyst, part of which took place with the Mets from 1999-2005.  He is one of only three broadcasters to work for both the Mets and the Yankees, joining Fran Healy and Tim McCarver.

In 2008, Seaver closed out Shea Stadium, throwing a final pitch to Mike Piazza following the last game of the season. In April of the following year, Seaver and Piazza opened Citi Field with a ceremonial first pitch.  This would be one of the last times Mets fans would get a chance to see Seaver on a baseball diamond, with the final time coming before the 2013 All-Star game at Citi Field.

Next. A review of the Tom Seaver documentary

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Seaver’s health had been in question ever since he retired from public life in March of 2019 due to his struggles with dementia, causing him to miss the 50th-anniversary celebration of the 1969 “Miracle Mets”.  His death is a sad ending to a legendary life, as we say goodbye to the greatest player to ever play for the New York Mets, Tom Seaver, may you rest in peace.

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