New York Mets News

Mets will face tough decision when Robinson Cano returns

By Dalton Allison
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - JULY 24: Pete Alonso #20 and Andres Gimenez #60 of the New York Mets celebrate a 1-0 win against the Atlanta Bravesduring Opening Day at Citi Field on July 24, 2020 in New York City. The 2020 season had been postponed since March due to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - JULY 24: Pete Alonso #20 and Andres Gimenez #60 of the New York Mets celebrate a 1-0 win against the Atlanta Bravesduring Opening Day at Citi Field on July 24, 2020 in New York City. The 2020 season had been postponed since March due to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images) /
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When Robinson Cano returns from the IL, the New York Mets will have a big decision to make when it comes to how their infield will look.

The New York Mets will face an interesting decision when Robinson Cano becomes reinstated from the injured list. Before suffering a grade two left abductor strain, Cano had shown a bat that warrants him being immediately reinserted into the lineup when he does return.

When Cano went down, the Mets figured that they would have a hole created in their lineup. His 14 hits in 34 at-bats had been the most consistent production in the lineup. With Cano going down, however, it opened up more playing time for Andres Gimenez.

With more time on the field, Gimenez has dazzled fans with his Gold Glove potential defense, as well as his unexpectedly vibrant bat. The 21-year-old has picked up on offense right where Cano left off, slashing 11 hits in 33 at-bats.

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While this type of production bodes well for the potential that Gimenez brings to the table, it also creates a tough decision for Luis Rojas. How will he be able to keep Gimenez in the lineup once Cano returns?

An easy solution would be to put Cano in the DH role and to move Gimenez over to play second base while Amed Rosario holds down the fort at short. But why should the Mets sacrifice Gimenez’s silky-smooth defense at short just to accommodate Rosario’s defensive shortcomings?

Rosario has never played second base in his professional career, and after struggling last season at short, has slowly built up his abilities in the field. It might be worth testing his abilities at second base because Gimenez is just that fantastic at short.

Another point of conversation that makes this debate more poignant is the fact that Rosario’s performance at the plate this season has been less than ideal. After a hot first couple of games, Rosario has cooled to the tune of a .226 OBP without drawing a walk this season.

With Rosario struggling, there should be a discussion of whether or not he should be the one trotting out to short for the Mets. While Rosario is 25 and still has a lot of room to grow, Gimenez’s limited showing has made him look much more capable to hold down the role than Rosario.

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If Rosario wants to remain in the Mets lineup, and he has shown flashes of potential that he can, he has to not only pick up a more consistent bat, but also a mitt for a new position.

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