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New York Mets History

Mets Trade Retrospective: Jim Hickman, Ron Hunt deal with the Dodgers in 1966

FLUSHING, NY - 1966: Aerial view of Shea Stadium, baseball home of the New York Mets of the National League taken during the 1966 season in Flushing, New York. (Photo by: Olen Collection/Diamond Images/Getty Images)
FLUSHING, NY - 1966: Aerial view of Shea Stadium, baseball home of the New York Mets of the National League taken during the 1966 season in Flushing, New York. (Photo by: Olen Collection/Diamond Images/Getty Images)
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After the 1966 season, the New York Mets traded Jim Hickman and Ron Hunt to the Los Angeles Dodgers. The trade eventually led to the organization acquiring two key members of the 1969 roster.

Two of the better position players in the early years of the New York Mets were traded together on November 29, 1966. In a deal with the Los Angeles Dodgers, Jim Hickman and Ron Hunt were sent to the Los Angeles Dodgers for Tommy Davis and Derrell Griffith.

Hunt’s four years with the Mets from 1963-1966 included two All-Star selections and plenty of positive attention. He was a .282 hitter during his time with the young Amazins and sometimes credited as one of the first stars in franchise history.

Meanwhile, Hickman was more of a role-player and utility man with the club. He hit for decent power as a part-timer player from 1962-1966.

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The trade moved two notable Mets westward to Hollywood for Griffith, a player who never actually played for them, and the much more productive Davis.

Davis’ time in New York, however, would be short-lived. After a successful 1967 campaign that included 16 home runs and a .302 batting average, he was flipped again. This time, Davis was headed to the Chicago White Sox.

This deal that sent Davis to the Windy City is the one worth remembering most. Along with Buddy Booker, Jack Fisher, and Billy Wynne, Davis was sent to the White Sox for Tommie Agee and Al Weis.

Agee and Weis are a pair of names Mets historians know well. Agee’s monster home run at Shea Stadium had its own plaque. Also an excellent defender, he is one of the best outfielders in franchise history. In 1969, he was the franchise’s top slugger.

Weis, on the other hand, is more forgotten with the exception of one big moment. In Game Five of the 1969 World Series, his home run in the seventh tied the game at 3. Without it, the Baltimore Orioles may have stormed back.

When the topic of MLB trades come up, it’s always important to look at the whole picture. The Hickman/Hunt deal may have done little to improve the team at the time.

Next. Greatest Mets trade deadline deals of all-time

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Because the club was able to then use the best piece they got back in return to acquire Agee and Weis, the 1969 season ended with a parade in New York.

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