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New York Mets: The oddest on-field moments in franchise history

NEW YORK, UNITED STATES: New York Mets' manager Bobby Valentine watches batting practice 23 October 2000 at Shea Stadium in Flushing Meadows, NY. The Mets trail the New York Yankees 2-0 in the World Series with game three on 24 October. AFP PHOTO/Jeff HAYNES (Photo credit should read JEFF HAYNES/AFP via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES: New York Mets' manager Bobby Valentine watches batting practice 23 October 2000 at Shea Stadium in Flushing Meadows, NY. The Mets trail the New York Yankees 2-0 in the World Series with game three on 24 October. AFP PHOTO/Jeff HAYNES (Photo credit should read JEFF HAYNES/AFP via Getty Images) /
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CINCINNATI, OH – SEPTEMBER 20: A general view of a baseball during a game between the Cincinnati Reds and the New York Mets at Great American Ball Park on September 20, 2019 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Jamie Sabau/Getty Images) *** Local Caption *** /

1979: The first fog-out at Shea Stadium

The late 1970s were, by Mets history standards, a bit of a fog. May 25, 1979 was no exception, as the Mets embarked on a marathon affair against the Pittsburgh Pirates. The game started innocently enough, with Mets starter Craig Swan beginning the game with four perfect innings.  He ended up pitching eight solid innings of three-run ball.

Still, the Mets were on the verge of losing 3-1 before rallying for two runs in the 9th, thanks to RBI hits from Lee Mazzilli and John Stearns. Extra innings followed, and the misty weather further deteriorated. By the time the Mets came to bat in the bottom of the 11th, there was virtually no visibility on the field.

Joel Youngblood led off with what appeared to be a routine fly ball to left field. However, because of the thick fog, Pirates outfielder Bill Robinson stood perplexed with no idea where the ball was. It dropped far away from where he stood, and Youngblood sprinted to third base with a fog-assisted triple.

From there, the Pirates pleaded with the umpires to stop the game, and play was soon halted. It took over an hour for the umpires to officially suspend the game, just after midnight on May 26. They ruled that the two teams would replay the game in its entirety at a later date, which they did as part of a doubleheader on June 25.

To this day, the Mets have never fared well with weather delays. It is very on-brand for this franchise to have a game completely nullified in which they had the winning run on third base with no one out.

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