New York Mets News

Mets catcher Wilson Ramos is finding ways to drive in runs

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - MAY 25: Wilson Ramos #40 of the New York Mets hits a two-run home run in the sixth inning against the Detroit Tigers at Citi Field on May 25, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Mike Stobe/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - MAY 25: Wilson Ramos #40 of the New York Mets hits a two-run home run in the sixth inning against the Detroit Tigers at Citi Field on May 25, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Mike Stobe/Getty Images) /
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New York Mets catcher Wilson Ramos has quietly been one of the team’s best hitters in the clutch and has offensive numbers comparable to other backstops around baseball.

Until recently, it felt like Wilson Ramos was greatly underperforming. His batting average was a few points below .250 and he was almost completely absent of power. Two home runs in Saturday’s game against the Detroit Tigers helped keep the New York Mets alive in a game eventually won by a walk-off home run from the bat of backup catcher Tomas Nido. Though still short in the power department this season, Ramos is finding ways to produce runs.

The more you appreciate newer analytical numbers, the more I think you wouldn’t like Ramos’ season. He’s not playing well defensively and numbers like WRC+ are below expectations.

Still, Ramos is among the leaders in several major categories when pitted against other catchers. His 31 RBI has him tied for fourth place. The 25 times he crossed the plate to score a run of his own is tied for third.

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What’s the key to Ramos’ success? He’s playing often. Only about half the catchers in baseball have played in 40 games this season. Whether due to injury or a platoon situation, many backstops are sitting far more often than Ramos. I understand this is partly because the Mets don’t have a consistently productive backup—at least offensively. There’s still something to be said about a catcher appearing in nearly every game.

Health was a major concern many had when the Mets inked him to a deal this offseason. Ramos has avoided the injury bug, participating in 48 of the team’s 52 games thus far.

Compared to other catchers in baseball, Ramos is having a good year. His .345 OBP is right where we want it to be. Once he starts driving a few more doubles and turns a couple of long fly balls into home runs, other numbers will improve.

For what it’s worth, Ramos is second on the Mets in RBI. Only Pete Alonso has whacked in runs more with 38 RBI of his own. In his 48 at-bats with runners in scoring position, he’s hitting .396/.464/.500. In other words, his numbers are far from hollow.

The Mets signed Ramos to produce well at and behind the plate. In a season that felt like it began poorly, things are evening out. He’s the man we should most want to see with a bat in his hands with an opportunity to do some damage.

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Though it may not feel like it, Ramos is having a good year.

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