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New York Mets History

Mets history of signing former Cy Young winners signed in free agency

PHOENIX, AZ - AUGUST 15: Bartolo Colon #40 of the New York Mets delivers a pitch during the first inning against the Arizona Diamondbacks at Chase Field on August 15, 2016 in Phoenix, Arizona. (Photo by Jennifer Stewart/Getty Images)
PHOENIX, AZ - AUGUST 15: Bartolo Colon #40 of the New York Mets delivers a pitch during the first inning against the Arizona Diamondbacks at Chase Field on August 15, 2016 in Phoenix, Arizona. (Photo by Jennifer Stewart/Getty Images)
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SAN DIEGO – AUGUST 23: David Cone #17 of the New York Mets delivers a pitch during a game against the San Diego Padres at Jack Murphy Stadium on August 23, 1992 in San Diego, California. (Photo by Ken Levine/Getty Images)

David Cone

David Cone falls on about any Cy Young Award list when mentioning the Mets aside from players who actually won one with the ball club. He was a future Cy Young Award winner that the team traded away. He’s also one they later acquired via free agency.

After some successful seasons in the late 1980s and early 1990s, Cone was traded by the Mets in the middle of 1992 to the Toronto Blue Jays. In 1994, he won a Cy Young as a member of the Kansas City Royals.

Mets fans watched from afar as Cone was one of the best pitchers of the decade. When he joined the New York Yankees in the latter part of the 1990s, it all hit a little too close to home. This was truer than ever when he tossed his perfect game for them during the franchise’s reign of terror when they won four championships in the span of five years.

Often considered for the award, the strike-shortened 1994 campaign was the only time he actually came away as the victor.

Cone missed all of 2002 due to injury but did plan a comeback with the Mets in 2003. Back with the team where he first shined, Cone was a 40-year-old on a team that ended up going nowhere.

Cone made four starts for the 2003 Mets and a relief appearance. Through those 18 innings of work, he went 1-3 with a 6.50 ERA. Even in this small sample size, it was painfully obvious Cone wasn’t going to recapture his glory days from the previous decade.

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