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New York Mets History: Top five players who got away from us

NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 29: A general view of Citi Field prior to the start of the Opening Day game between the New York Mets and the St. Louis Cardinals at Citi Field on March 29, 2018 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Mike Stobe/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 29: A general view of Citi Field prior to the start of the Opening Day game between the New York Mets and the St. Louis Cardinals at Citi Field on March 29, 2018 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Mike Stobe/Getty Images)
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PHOENIX, AZ – AUGUST 30: Former New York Mets infielder Marco Scutaro #19 of the San Francisco Giants at bat against the Arizona Diamondbacks at Chase Field on August 30, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. The Giants defeated the Diamondbacks 1-0. (Photo by Jennifer Stewart/Getty Images)

Once members of the New York Mets, these five players left the organization before fans got to experience the best of them.

Throughout the history of the New York Mets, there have been many instances of bad moves that were executed by the front office. The organization has done a generally good job of drafting and developing players, but when it comes to deciding who to keep and who to trade, and when to trade, it has been something of a sore spot for the Mets.

As I researched players for this article, I have found there have been many cases of players that have either been drafted or acquired by the Mets, early in the players’ career, but then the organization didn’t show enough patience to complete their development or traded them for older past their prime type players.

So from a big list that included big names of Amos Otis, Jeff Reardon, Mike Scott, Jeromy Burnitz, and Rick Aguilera, I was able to narrow my search down to the following players that made my list of the top five players that got away.

5) Marco Scutaro

Marco Scutaro started his MLB career with the brief call-ups with the Mets in 2002 and 2003. After a solid minor league career, the Mets made the bad decision to non-tender Scutaro, and he was acquired by the Oakland Athletics on October 9th, 2003.

Once on the A’s, they recognized his talent and inserted him as the starting 2B. But Scutaro, being extremely versatile, also logged innings at SS and 3B. From 2004 to 2008, Scutaro was a solid .700 to .750 OPS batter and an above-average defender at 2B, SS, and 3B.

Then at age 33, now on the Toronto Bluejays, Scutaro became more than just his typical solid utility type player. With much hard work, he turned himself into one of the top shortstops in the American League. His OPS went to .750+ and was now the everyday shortstop on the Bluejays and the Red Sox.

Later in his career, he was traded back to the National League, where Scutaro went back to playing mostly 2B, while also backing up SS and 3B for the San Francisco Giants. He was also part of the 2012 World Series-winning Giants, hitting .362 over 61 games after coming over in a mid-season trade from the Colorado Rockies. He eventually won the MVP Award of the 2012 NLCS, where he batted 14 for 28 for a .500 batting average over the seven-game series win. He was also an All-Star in 2013 representing the Giants.

We definitely could have used him on the Mets in 2006, 2007 and 2008 where we had solid teams but was not necessarily strong at the 2B position. I would of much rather have had Marco Scutaro playing 2B instead of Luis Castillo. He would have caught that fly ball in the Subway Series.

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