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New York Mets All-Time Lists

All-time best Mets players born in New York at every position

FLUSHING, NY - JULY 23: Paul LoDuca #16 and David Wright #5 of the New York Mets talk during their game against the Houston Astros on July 23, 2006 at Shea Stadium in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York, New York. The Astros defeated the Mets 8-4. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
FLUSHING, NY - JULY 23: Paul LoDuca #16 and David Wright #5 of the New York Mets talk during their game against the Houston Astros on July 23, 2006 at Shea Stadium in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York, New York. The Astros defeated the Mets 8-4. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
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NEW YORK, NEW YORK – JUNE 29: Former New York Met Ed Kranepool speaks to the crowd during the 50th Anniversary of the Mets winning the World Series in 1969 at Citi Field on June 29, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)

First Baseman: Ed Kranepool

How do you mention New Yorkers who played for the Mets and not bring up Ed Kranepool? He is Mr. Met. And I don’t mean the guy with the giant baseball head.

Kranepool spent his entire 18-year career with the Mets. From 1962 until 1979, he was a member of the National League representative of New York. Born in New York and a high school attendee in The Bronx, he was as much about the city as any player in team history.

During his MLB career, Kranepool amassed 1,418 hits, 118 home runs, and 1,853 games played. His numbers may not be flashy. However, what he represented and the hard work he put into playing the game well is what made him a franchise icon.

Second Baseman: T.J. Rivera

I’m torn between which New Yorker to put here. While Joe Panik has a legitimate shot to take this spot at second base, I’m going to award first honors to T.J. Rivera. We never got to see all of what Rivera had to offer. A delayed big-league promotion and injuries shortened his time with the organization.

Born in The Bronx, Rivera played more than second base. In 2016 and 2017 he was a utility man the Mets could depend on for two things: willingness to play anywhere they asked and lots of hits.

In his 344 trips to the plate, Rivera managed to hit .304/.335/.445. Unfortunately, the longest chapter of Rivera’s professional baseball career is titled “What If?

Third Baseman: Joe Torre

Joe Torre may be in the Hall of Fame for his managing, but his playing career wasn’t half bad either. The Brooklyn-born third baseman didn’t have an incredible playing career with the Mets. However, his impact is noted.

In parts of three seasons with the Metropolitans, Torres batted .267/.327/.374 with 12 home runs. His penultimate season in 1976 was easily the best. He hit .306 in a part-time role.

I suppose an honorable mention could go out to David Wright. Born in Norfolk, Virginia, The Captain is from the town where the longtime Mets Triple-A squad, the Norfolk Tides, used to play.

Shortstop: John Valentin

The Mets don’t have an especially deep history at shortstop. Each decade seems to have one noteworthy player. Between Rey Ordonez and Jose Reyes, John Valentin played the position for the 2002 Mets.

After 10 seasons with the Boston Red Sox, the Mineola native joined the Mets for his final big league season. Valentine hit .240/.339/.356 with 3 home runs and 30 RBI in 242 plate appearances.

Maybe one of the weakest players on this list as far as Mets-exclusive performances go, it’s still nice to have at least a guy many of us have heard of.

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