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New York Mets History

Mets trade history with the Indians highlighted by two epic disasters

CLEVELAND, OH - SEPTEMBER 6: Eric Young Jr. #22 of the New York Mets is tagged out by shortstop Asdrubal Cabrera #13 of the Cleveland Indians after being caught in a run down during the eighth inning at Progressive Field on September 6, 2013 in Cleveland, Ohio. (Photo by Jason Miller/Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, OH - SEPTEMBER 6: Eric Young Jr. #22 of the New York Mets is tagged out by shortstop Asdrubal Cabrera #13 of the Cleveland Indians after being caught in a run down during the eighth inning at Progressive Field on September 6, 2013 in Cleveland, Ohio. (Photo by Jason Miller/Getty Images)
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CLEVELAND, OHIO – JULY 08: Carlos Santana of the Cleveland Indians and Pete Alonso of the New York Mets are introduced during the T-Mobile Home Run Derby at Progressive Field on July 08, 2019 in Cleveland, Ohio. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)

It’s not often we see the New York Mets and Cleveland Indians play each other or make a trade. For the latter, the reason may be because two of the franchise’s worst trades involved the Tribe.

The New York Mets and Cleveland Indians haven’t made too many trades during the 2010s. Following a three-team deal in December 2008, the only other transaction you will find on the list until 2017 involved the Mets purchasing Wilson Valdez from the Tribe in 2009.

In 2017, the drought ended when the Mets traded Jay Bruce to the Indians for minor leaguer Ryder Ryan. More recently, the teams struck up a deal which involved backup catcher Kevin Plawecki and current Mets pitcher Walker Lockett.

None of those deals were nearly as impactful to these two franchises as another pair from the past. During their history of wheeling and dealing, the Metropolitans have had some epic disasters. The Indians were involved in two which took place less than five years apart.

The factors that make a trade bad for a team involve what they give up and who they receive. At least in the case of one of these deals, the Mets were obliterated in both areas.

Trades always take a while to fully develop. Until everyone involved has played out his professional career, you can never fully know who won or lost the deal. Sometimes, though, there are more things to consider such as what else a team could have acquired for the prospects they gave up.

More important than anything else, we have to ask if the players a team acquired helped them win. Were they productive on the field?

In the case of these two historically bad Mets trades, the answer two both is absolutely no.

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