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Mets must not wait to fire Mickey Callaway, hire Joe Girardi

ATLANTA, GA - APRIL 12: Manager Mickey Callaway of the New York Mets looks on before the seventh inning of an MLB game against the Atlanta Braves at SunTrust Park on April 12, 2018 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Todd Kirkland/Getty Images)
ATLANTA, GA - APRIL 12: Manager Mickey Callaway of the New York Mets looks on before the seventh inning of an MLB game against the Atlanta Braves at SunTrust Park on April 12, 2018 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Todd Kirkland/Getty Images)
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NEW YORK, NEW YORK – JULY 06: Manager Mickey Callaway #36 of the New York Mets argues with home plate umpire Tripp Gibson after he was ejected from a game against the Philadelphia Phillies in the fifth inning at Citi Field on July 06, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)

The Antics

The drama that has come to constantly swirl around Callaway should have become unbearable for the organization now, as well. He is laughably inconsistent when it comes to addressing the media, and that is not a good look for the Mets.

The most recent example happened this past weekend. Shortstop Amed Rosario was left out of Sunday’s lineup after failing to run out a single the day before. When addressing the print and online media, Callaway said Rosario was not playing because it was a scheduled day off, but he then told the Mets’ television and radio personnel that it was a disciplinary benching.

In Sunday’s postgame press conference, he did not give any concrete answers about the situation. Rosario himself is the one who clarified, saying he was benched because of Saturday’s lack of hustle.

The highlight of Callaway’s season by far, however, was his tirade that took place on June 23 at Wrigley Field. While he was speaking to the press, a reporter, Tim Healey of Newsday, said “See you tomorrow” to Callaway and Callaway lost his mind, claiming Healey was being sarcastic.

He threatened to knock him out and, to make matters worse, starting pitcher Jason Vargas got involved and tried to charge at Healey. Many believed that was the last straw and that Callaway would surely be fired for his antics but, instead, he and Vargas were fined.

A fellow NL East manager commenting on the situation said that Callaway was definitely trying to get fired.  There is no doubt in my mind that the Mets handled the situation poorly and that Callaway should have immediately been relieved of his duties.

This was an embarrassment for the organization as well as a bad example set for the players that the baseball world got a good laugh out of.

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