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Mets, Hall of Fame pitchers, and why baseball needs to set a new standard

COOPERSTOWN, NY - JULY 29: The podium is seen at Clark Sports Center during the Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony on July 29, 2018 in Cooperstown, New York. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
COOPERSTOWN, NY - JULY 29: The podium is seen at Clark Sports Center during the Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony on July 29, 2018 in Cooperstown, New York. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
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NEW YORK, NEW YORK – MAY 01: Jacob deGrom #48 of the New York Mets delivers a pitch in the first inning against the Cincinnati Reds at Citi Field on May 01, 2019 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)

How Mets Pitchers Stack Up

Jacob deGrom is a case I want to look at. He’s not getting into the Hall of Fame. At age 30, it would take a half dozen historic years to even consider making an exception. Among other things aside from the game evolving, the Mets’ ace has an uphill climb solely because of how long it even takes for most starters to become effective big league pitchers.

College players are already at a disadvantage when compared to their teammates who were drafted out of high school. Even if they get through the minor leagues in two seasons, you have to figure, many pitchers are promoted midseason for the franchise to keep an extra year of control. This takes away a half-season already.

What’s more, many excellent starters will struggle for a year or two or develop into the bullpen as a reliever. deGrom can consider himself lucky the Mets put him in as a starter right away. We don’t always see this.

Noah Syndergaard, meanwhile, is an example of a pitcher who entered the professional baseball world straight from high school and has a head start over many others. Despite his talents, we’ve seen the rocky years from him. His Hall of Fame chances are far greater than deGrom’s even now because of the years he has ahead of him.

For starting pitchers, we can’t really look at the numbers they compile. Careers typically don’t last as long and even when they do, their win totals are cut in half. Wins are a poor barometer for a pitcher’s success—just ask deGrom circa 2018.

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