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New York Mets All-Time Lists

Greatest Mets players at each position drafted after round 10

1989: Lenny Dykstra of the New York Mets swings at the pitch during a game in the 1989 season. ( Photo by: Getty Images/Getty Images)
1989: Lenny Dykstra of the New York Mets swings at the pitch during a game in the 1989 season. ( Photo by: Getty Images/Getty Images)
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30 Sep 1999: Benny Agbayani #50 of the New York Mets swings at the ball during a game against the Atlanta Braves at Shea Stadium in Flushing, New York. The Braves defeated the Mets 4-3.

Outfielders

LF-Jason Bay (22)

Jason Bay could be considered one of the worst Mets of all-time. Largely because of his failure to meet expectations of a huge contract, we look at him in a negative light. Considering he was a 22nd round draft choice by the Montreal Expos in 2000, I have a little more sympathy.

Bay’s underwhelming numbers with the Mets include a .234/.318/.369 batting line and plenty of time on the sidelines serving time on the list formerly known as disabled. From what New Yorkers witnessed up close, it comes as no shock that he was passed over as often as he was in the draft.

CF-Lenny Dykstra (13)

Center fielder Lenny Dykstra didn’t spend all that long with the Mets organization. However, even in the short time, he had an impact on the organization even as a 13th round selection by the team in 1981.

Dykstra batted .278/.350/.413 with the Mets. He stole 30 bases for them twice and had a shot for a third time if not for the midseason 1989 trade which sent him to the Philadelphia Phillies. Dykstra’s stay in Flushing was brief. Given where he was taken in the draft, the team is lucky to have gotten anything at all.

RF-Benny Agbayani (30)

Do you still have Benny Agbayani fever? In 1999, the former 30th round draft pick put together an unexpectedly awesome year with the Mets. He repeated it again in 2000 and even showed us plenty of production in his 91 games during the 2001 campaign.

Agbayani’s career totals with the Mets included a .282/.372/.461 batting line accomplished largely as a part-time player. Even though left field was his primary position, I’m going to have to move him into right where he also spent some time. Hopefully, he remembers how many outs there are.

Next. Mets home run leaders by decade

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Are there any other late round draft picks you think deserve to make this list?

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