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New York Mets History

New York Mets best and worst transaction every year since 2010

PORT ST. LUCIE, FL - MARCH 02: Outfielder Jason Bay #44 of the New York Mets poses for photos during MLB photo day on March 2, 2012 in Port St. Lucie, Florida. (Photo by Marc Serota/Getty Images)
PORT ST. LUCIE, FL - MARCH 02: Outfielder Jason Bay #44 of the New York Mets poses for photos during MLB photo day on March 2, 2012 in Port St. Lucie, Florida. (Photo by Marc Serota/Getty Images)
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NEW YORK – AUGUST 28: Jason Bay #44 of the New York Mets looks on from the dugout against the Houston Astros on August 28, 2010 at Citi Field in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)

2010

Best: Drafting Matt Harvey and Jacob deGrom

The 2010 calendar year for the Mets didn’t include any positive signings or trades. Not yet ready to undergo a rebuild, they were quite active in attempting to better the big league roster.

Where they succeeded the most was in the draft. The 2010 draft added two future stars to the organization.

In the first round, the Mets selected pitcher Matt Harvey. While he never fully met expectations, there’s no denying how much he captivated fans and offered some hope. In the ninth round, the Mets took another pitcher: Jacob deGrom. His story with the franchise is not yet finished, but it already includes a Rookie of the Year and Cy Young.

The 2010 draft wasn’t exponentially great for the Mets. These two selections alone make it a memorable one.

Worst: Signing Jason Bay on January 5

How bad was the Jason Bay signing? It made it on this list twice. On January 5, 2010, the Mets signed the free agent outfielder to a regrettably big contract. Bay never came close to playing up to expectations.

In three seasons with the Mets, Bay played in only 288 games. He slashed .234/.318/.369 while earning a hefty-sum of money.

If there is any consolation prize, Bay played only one more year after the Mets released him. He wasn’t very good either. So, unlike others who haunt the Mets from the past, at least he didn’t become a regrettable player they let walk away. Instead, he’s just a guy they should have stayed away from in the first place.

Next. The Greatest Mets of All-Time

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