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New York Mets best and worst transaction every year since 2010

PORT ST. LUCIE, FL - MARCH 02: Outfielder Jason Bay #44 of the New York Mets poses for photos during MLB photo day on March 2, 2012 in Port St. Lucie, Florida. (Photo by Marc Serota/Getty Images)
PORT ST. LUCIE, FL - MARCH 02: Outfielder Jason Bay #44 of the New York Mets poses for photos during MLB photo day on March 2, 2012 in Port St. Lucie, Florida. (Photo by Marc Serota/Getty Images)
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NEW YORK, NY – OCTOBER 30: Noah Syndergaard #34 of the New York Mets against the Kansas City Royals during Game Three of the 2015 World Series at Citi Field on October 30, 2015 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)

2012

Best: Trading R.A. Dickey for Noah Syndergaard on December 17

As a general manager, you have to have a huge set of stones to trade the reigning Cy Young winner. Only weeks after he officially won the award, the Mets traded pitcher R.A. Dickey to the Toronto Blue Jays.

Joining Dickey, Mike Nickeas and Josh Thole also left the Mets. In return they received Wuilmer Becerra, John Buck, Travis d’Arnaud, and Noah Syndergaard.

At the time of the trade, d’Arnaud was the prized-possession. He had already been traded for a past Cy Young winner when the Philadelphia Phillies shipped him to Toronto in the Roy Halladay deal. Thankfully, the Mets managed to get more than him in this trade. Syndergaard is one of the best pitchers in the National League and quite possibly the third player involved in a d’Arnaud deal to win the league’s best pitcher award.

This deal could have backfired greatly. Instead, it’s the best made in all of 2012.

Worst: Finally releasing Jason Bay on November 7

On November 7, 2012 the Mets finally put the Jason Bay Era out of its misery. Bay was given his release after three miserable years in New York.

We can’t really blame the Mets for waiting this long, though, can we? They had to see to it that they were certain he had nothing to offer. The .165 batting average in 70 games played during the 2012 campaign was enough to convince management to cut their losses and be done with him.

Bay brought little joy to Flushing other than some excitement at the initial signing. Injuries, bad play, and a whole lot of money are what we think of whenever his name appears. It’s unfortunate the Mets didn’t see how bad this was going a little sooner. Considering they didn’t make any other epically bad decisions in 2012, this one ends up as the worst of the year.

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