New York Mets History

New York Mets top ten first-round draft picks since the year 2000

CINCINNATI, OH - JULY 12: (L-R) Michael Conforto #8 and Brandon Nimmo #9 of the U.S. Team talks during the SiriusXM All-Star Futures Game against the World Team at the Great American Ball Park on July 12, 2015 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)
CINCINNATI, OH - JULY 12: (L-R) Michael Conforto #8 and Brandon Nimmo #9 of the U.S. Team talks during the SiriusXM All-Star Futures Game against the World Team at the Great American Ball Park on July 12, 2015 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images) /
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WASHINGTON, DC – JULY 26: Matt Harvey #33 of the New York Mets pitches in the first inning against the Washington Nationals at Nationals Park on July 26, 2013 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Greg Fiume/Getty Images) /

4) Matt Harvey

Who thought Matt Harvey would ever not be in the top three? A bad ending with the Mets and an even worse beginning with the Los Angeles Angels in 2019 have me unwilling to put him any higher. In fact, you could argue he deserves to be lower.

I’ll be kind and keep him in the four-spot because of how dominant he was during his best years. Harvey’s 34-37 record as a member of the Mets isn’t as great as we remember. His lifetime ERA with all teams now near 4.00 is another statistic to show off how the 7th overall pick from 2010 saw his greatness slip away over the year.

Harvey will always have a place in the hearts of many Mets fans. He was the first potential superstar to rise up after the collapses of 2007 and 2008. He was also “our guy” because of the team’s decision to take him in the draft. If he ever gets a chance to pitch at Citi Field again, I expect more of a thunderous applause than a flood of boos.

3) Michael Conforto

I’m not afraid to criticize Michael Conforto and his inconsistent play. However, now in his fifth big league season, I will admit how crucial his performance is to the Mets. He’s someone they have decided to build around. Fortunately, when he’s able to stay healthy, Conforto often finds a way to contribute.

Because Conforto’s numbers seem to fluctuate so much from year-to-year, it’s hard to designate him as a .250 hitter—where his career total averages out to. In a good year, Conforto will hit around .270 and knock 30 home runs. He has yet to reach this total, but for two straight seasons, we saw the potential to rip dingers at a pace like this.

There’s plenty of Conforto left to see in a Mets’ uniform. Selected 10th overall in 2014, he’s the most recent first-round pick to play in the major leagues based on the date he was drafted. He’s also the one contributing the most to this current ball club.

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