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New York Mets History

Mets single-season records in no danger of being broken

18 Jul 1998: Infielder John Olerud #5 of the New York Mets in action during the game against the Philadelphia Phillies at Shea Stadium in Flushing, New York. The Mets defeated the Phillies 7-0.
18 Jul 1998: Infielder John Olerud #5 of the New York Mets in action during the game against the Philadelphia Phillies at Shea Stadium in Flushing, New York. The Mets defeated the Phillies 7-0.
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17 Oct 1999: John Olerud #5 of the New York Mets hits a home run during the NLCS game four against the Atlanta Braves at Shea Stadium in Flushing, New York. The Mets defeated the Braves 4-3. Mandatory Credit: David Leeds /Allsport

John Olerud’s .354 batting average in 1998

The Mets knew they were getting a very good hitter when they landed John Olerud. What they didn’t expect was for him to set a franchise record.

During the 1998 campaign, Olerud batted .354. This beat Cleon Jones’ .340 batting average in 1969 for the greatest in Mets history.

That same year, Mike Piazza batted .348. Of course, Piazza didn’t spend the whole year with the Mets. He still did have enough at-bats to qualify and earn a second-place spot on the list.

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Olerud’s batting average record has had a few challengers. Moises Alou batted .341 in 2007 and if not for injury, may have swiped Olerud’s record.

The 1998 season was an amazing one for Olerud. He set some other records, too, including a .447 OBP and 125 walks. Both of those single-season totals should last a little longer. It’s the batting average I’m most intrigued by. You never know when the Mets may find their Joey Votto to walk 126 times and finish the year with a .448 OBP. Expecting a .354 batting average seems a little less likely.

Nobody in either league has finished the season with a .354 batting average or higher since Josh Hamilton in 2010 when he hit .359. In the National League, you have to go back to 2008 when the sworn enemy of the Mets, Chipper Jones, led the league with a .364 average.

Olerud’s record is safe for now. Based on the trends in Major League Baseball, there’s nothing to worry about.

Jose Reyes’s 78 stolen bases in 2007

Pitchers have changed. Batters have changed. Base runners have, too.

In 2007, Mets shortstop Jose Reyes set a record I don’t see anyone topping. His 78 stolen bases is a modern marvel.

You have to go back to 1992 when Marquis Grissom stole 78 bases to even find a tie for Reyes’ Mets record. Before that, it’s Vince Coleman’s 81 swiped bags in 1988.

Reyes and Roger Cedeno are the only two men in Mets history to end the year with 60 or more stolen bases. If we lower the milestone to 50, we can only add Mookie Wilson and Lance Johnson to the list.

Nothing indicates stolen bases will come back in fashion anytime soon. It’s like poodle skirts, bell-bottoms, and white shoes after Labor Day. It will take a uniquely talented individual to have any shot at breaking this record.

Next. Who is the greatest Mets player of all-time?

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Which Mets record do you think is least likely to get broken?

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