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New York Mets All-Time Lists

New York Mets: Top five third basemen in franchise history

PHILADELPHIA, PA - APRIL 18: David Wright #5 of the New York Mets rounds the bases in the ninth inning afafter hitting his second home run of the game against the Philadelphia Phillies at Citizens Bank Park on April 18, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Mets won 5-2. (Photo by Drew Hallowell/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - APRIL 18: David Wright #5 of the New York Mets rounds the bases in the ninth inning afafter hitting his second home run of the game against the Philadelphia Phillies at Citizens Bank Park on April 18, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Mets won 5-2. (Photo by Drew Hallowell/Getty Images) /
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9 Mar 1999: Infielder Robin Ventura #4 of the New York Mets stands as he waits to bat during the Spring Training game against the Atlanta Braves at the Disney”s Wide World of Sports Complex in Kissimmee, Florida. The Mets defeated the Braves 9-3. Mandatory Credit: Andy Lyons /Allsport /

3) Robin Ventura

I alluded to why Alfonzo wasn’t at third base during the great Mets seasons of the late 1990s and early 2000s. That’s because Robin Ventura was over there making his own mark on the team’s history.

In his three seasons with the Mets, Ventura gave them power and someone to crowd the bases. Ventura’s batting average wasn’t always the best, but he made sure to take his walks and get on base as much as possible.

The first year he spent with the Metropolitans in 1999 was by far the best. Ventura knocked 32 home runs and ended the year with 120 RBI. His .301/.379/.529 batting line assisted further in making him the sixth-place finisher in the MVP vote.

Ventura hit in the .230s the following two seasons, flushing his Flushing batting line down. He still hit for power and found ways to get on base, but a lesser batting average helped sign his ticket out of Flushing and to the Bronx.

When the Mets went to back-to-back postseason in 1999 and 2000, Ventura did very little to help. He didn’t hit above .214 in any of the five series he played in. However, he did have one incredible moment when in Game Five of the 1999 NLCS he hit the famous walk-off grand slam single to keep the Mets alive.

Ventura is a beloved player in Mets history for the clutch moments he delivered in a brief time. Longevity is the one thing he lacks and a major reason why he doesn’t rank higher on the list of the franchise’s greatest third basemen.

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