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New York Mets History

New York Mets: The rise and fall of The Dark Knight Matt Harvey

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ATLANTA, GA - JUNE 09: Matt Harvey #33 of the New York Mets sits in the dugout during the sixth inning against the Atlanta Braves at SunTrust Park on June 9, 2017 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
ATLANTA, GA - JUNE 09: Matt Harvey #33 of the New York Mets sits in the dugout during the sixth inning against the Atlanta Braves at SunTrust Park on June 9, 2017 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
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The Final Moment of Glory

Harvey was one of the Mets aces of the 2015 World Series team, winning 13 games with a 2.71 ERA (I say one of them because the argument could be made that deGrom, Syndergaard, and Harvey all had ace-quality stuff). Plus, who could forget when he pleaded with Terry Collins to let him go back out for the ninth inning in game five of the World Series after completely dominating the Royals lineup?

Harvey was a competitor. He wanted the ball in high-stress situations, granted that game five didn’t end how Mets fans wanted it to, but he wanted the ball.

Fast forward to 2016, when the wheels started to fall off of the proverbial bus. His numbers were bad, his velocity was down, and most people thought that he was pitching through injury. He made only seventeen starts, posting a 4-10 record with a 4.86 ERA before opting for surgery to treat thoracic outlet syndrome, a condition that most people had never even heard of before. His season was done by the end of July.

Harvey returned in 2017 and flashed some signs of returning to form, despite the velocity still not being in the mid-90s like fans were accustomed to, but he was getting outs.

In early May, he was suspended for three games because he did not show up to the ballpark after a night out and a golf outing that took place the morning of the Mets game, which resulted in him getting a headache.

This created some animosity between Harvey and his teammates, but he returned to pitch, and boy was he bad. He finished the season with a 6.70 ERA, winning only five ball games.

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