Fansided
Rising Apple
New York Mets prospects

New York Mets: 10 undervalued prospects to watch this season

nscheurer
PHILADELPHIA - MAY 01: Batting helmets are seen during batting practice before the Philadelphia Phillies play the New York Mets at Citizens Bank Park on May 1, 2010 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA - MAY 01: Batting helmets are seen during batting practice before the Philadelphia Phillies play the New York Mets at Citizens Bank Park on May 1, 2010 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
facebooktwitterreddit
5 of 6
Mets
Mets

Jeremy Vasquez 1B

Vasquez was Peter Alonso’s teammate at the University of Florida and may follow in his footsteps as a breakout first baseman for the Mets organization. Drafted in the 27th round of the 2017 draft, Vasquez was originally unheralded. But, his stats show an elite ability to get on base.

Between Single-A and High-A, Vasquez slashed .280/.369/.421 and hit 10 home runs through 125 games in 2018. These are numbers similar to what Dominic Smith put up in the minors. That’s a good thing.

Vasquez has a short left-handed swing that generates base hits with some pop. And, perhaps most importantly, he has an excellent understanding of the strike zone, leading to walks and a high on-base percentage.

He is still in the low Minors but there is no denying that his numbers are good. And, there is still plenty of time for him to burst through the ceiling and become a breakout performer with real Major League potential. He is ignored by most prospect lists but is a player worth keeping an eye on for the next few years.

Chris Viall RHP

I love tall and projectable pitchers. Viall is exciting because he clocks in at 6’9’’ and owns a plus fastball. The Mets took him in the 6th round of the 2016 draft out of Stanford as a project with a high ceiling.

So far, his numbers aren’t eye-popping. He threw 66.1 innings in Single-A ball last year and gave up 35 runs (4.75 ERA) albeit while striking out 94 (12.8 K/9). The potential Viall possesses is his ability to miss bats. His stuff is good, so the Mets would like to see him remain a starter. But, if he can’t handle the workload, they’ll be glad to make him a power reliever with late-inning potential.

He walked 5.6 batters per 9 innings last year so as of right now he’s just a hard throwing 20-year-old that struggles to find the zone. That being said, if ever does learn to pound the strike zone, he’ll be a very valuable asset indeed.

His profile sort of reminds me of Tyler Glasnow. Perhaps with a couple more years of development, Viall will receive enough praise for his arsenal and size to get a shot at the big leagues despite the control issues, like Glasnow has.

facebooktwitterreddit