Fansided
Rising Apple
New York Mets prospects

New York Mets: 10 undervalued prospects to watch this season

nscheurer
PHILADELPHIA - MAY 01: Batting helmets are seen during batting practice before the Philadelphia Phillies play the New York Mets at Citizens Bank Park on May 1, 2010 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA - MAY 01: Batting helmets are seen during batting practice before the Philadelphia Phillies play the New York Mets at Citizens Bank Park on May 1, 2010 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
facebooktwitterreddit
1 of 6
Mets
Mets

The top New York Mets minor leaguers get plenty of attention from the fans. However, there are a few other names you should watch closely this season.

After a flurry of trades executed by GM Brodie Van Wagenen this offseason, the New York Mets are once again left with one of the Major League’s worst farm systems.

That being said, you don’t need to be a blue-chip prospect to make it to the big leagues and become a major contributor. There are plenty of valuable players near the end of top 30 prospect lists or possibly even omitted altogether.

To find an undervalued prospect, we must ask ourselves a couple of questions. What is valued? What should be valued? Some prospects tend to receive attention they don’t deserve due to being a high draft pick or having some former big league relative.

More from Rising Apple

The truth is, the value of a prospect lies in their floor and ceiling. A high ceiling gives a young player a lot of room to grow and perhaps reach a level of performance that is very valuable to a Major League club. Meanwhile, a player’s floor indicates their worst case scenario such as if their development as a player suddenly plateaus.

A lot of the players I evaluate will have high ceilings and low floors. The reason we care more about a high ceiling than a low floor is because the goal of a farm system is to produce Major League players.

There is no difference between a ballplayer not being good enough to play past Single-A vs. not being good enough to play past Triple-A. The success of the Mets organization ultimately hinges on the ability of their Major League roster.

Players with high ceilings and low floors are sort of like lottery tickets. Collecting a lot of these tickets increases an organization’s chance of graduating a couple of top-tier talents rather than graduating a lot of average players.

If the Mets ever need roster fillers in the future, they’ll have no problem signing veterans to Minor League deals. But, to find diamonds in the rough that are cheap and controllable, it’s important not to undervalue some players who are relatively unknown.

Make no mistake though, unheralded prospects don’t need to become superstars to provide value on a big league team. A bench, bullpen, or 5th starter role is perfectly good value, especially for young players who are mostly ignored by the average fan for most of their Minor League career.

Most guys playing at the highest level don’t receive a lick of attention until one day they’re a regular on your favorite team’s 25 man roster and they whack a pinch-hit walk-off home run or save a game in the 14th inning.

“Who is that guy?” you’ll say. “Is he new?” you’ll ponder. I’m about to give you a heads up on which Mets players you’ll one day have to google after saying aloud “where did he come from?”.

Here are 10 under the radar Mets prospects that serious fans should keep an eye on for the next few years.

facebooktwitterreddit