Fansided
Rising Apple
New York Mets All-Time Lists

New York Mets: 30 greatest players in franchise history

NEW YORK - APRIL 05: Fans outside the stadium prior to the Opening Day Game between the New York Mets and the Florida Marlins at Citi Field on April 5, 2010 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Nick Laham/Getty Images)
NEW YORK - APRIL 05: Fans outside the stadium prior to the Opening Day Game between the New York Mets and the Florida Marlins at Citi Field on April 5, 2010 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Nick Laham/Getty Images)
facebooktwitterreddit
13 of 31
New York Mets
(Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)

Sid Fernandez

. P. 1984-1993. Sid Fernandez. 19. 3

Known as “El Sid” to his friends and enemies, Sid Fernandez is one of those overlooked Mets from the 1980s. On a roster with some of the league’s best players, many forget just how fantastic Fernandez’s time with the Mets was.

Fernandez doesn’t own records per se. However, one notable accomplishment he did achieve was a franchise-best 5.706 hits per nine in 1985. What’s more, El Sid has two other seasons in the franchise’s top-10 of lowest hits per nine frames. Only Nolan Ryan has a better career total of hits per nine.

As a result of preventing hits at such an awesome rate, Fernandez also ranks No. 4 in franchise history in WHIP at 1.113.

Other notable numbers from Fernandez’s time with the Mets include 98 wins, 1,449 strikeouts and two trips to the All-Star Game. In every year of his Mets career, Fernandez never posted an ERA higher than 3.81. He kept the score low at all points of his career. The biggest reason for it was his unmatched ability at not allowing base runners.

Three times Fernandez led the league in fewest hits per nine. Once, he led the league in strikeouts per nine. It was in 1985 when he accomplished the latter. It was a breakout year for Fernandez in what would become a fabulous end of the decade.

In the postseason, Fernandez struggled as a starter, but came through in relief during the 1986 World Series. Through his 6.2 innings pitched, he owned a 1.35 ERA against the Boston Red Sox. If not for those big outs from the bullpen, the Mets’ championship drought may have reached the half-century mark.

facebooktwitterreddit