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New York Mets: Examining ten relievers they received in recent trades

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CHICAGO, IL - AUGUST 29: Jacob Rhame #35 of the New York Mets pitches against the Chicago Cubs during the ninth inning at Wrigley Field on August 29, 2018 in Chicago, Illinois. The New York Mets won 10-3. (Photo by Jon Durr/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - AUGUST 29: Jacob Rhame #35 of the New York Mets pitches against the Chicago Cubs during the ninth inning at Wrigley Field on August 29, 2018 in Chicago, Illinois. The New York Mets won 10-3. (Photo by Jon Durr/Getty Images)
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Stephen Nogosek

Stephen Nogosek is the last bullpen piece to come from the 2017 Addison Reed trade. He has spent no time in the majors and may only have hope for a 2019 September call-up.

Throwing 52.1 innings between Advanced-A and Double-A in 2018, Nogosek allowed 29 earned runs (4.99 ERA) but managed 58 strikeouts in his first full minor league season with the Mets.

He’s a righty with a quick arm that is definitely suited for a lifetime bullpen role. His fastball sits low to mid-90’s and he has a cutter and slider that each occasionally flash plus.

Unless his cutter turns into Mariano Rivera’s, don’t expect much from Nogosek. He’s a guy to root for when he gets called up but he’ll never surpass his middle relief ceiling. You’ll probably catch a glimpse of him in September of 2019 when rosters expand.

Jacob Rhame

Jacob Rhame came over to the Mets in the 2017 deal that sent Curtis Granderson to the Dodgers. He profiled as somewhat of a wild card given his relatively underdeveloped tools.

Other than collecting one save during the 2018 season, Rhame has had no success in the majors whatsoever. After a cup of coffee with the Mets in 2017 that saw him throw 9 innings and give up 9 earned runs (9.00 ERA), he was given another shot in 2018 where he threw 32.1 innings and gave up an inexcusable 21 earned runs (5.85 ERA).

Rhame is a right-hander who throws a lot like Hansel Robles. He opens up his hips before throwing a flat fastball with zero deception that sits mid to high-90’s. His curveball and changeup are sub-par which allow big league hitters to tee off on his fastball even though the velocity is so high.

Rhame will compete for a job in 2019. However, he is probably better suited as a depth arm and isn’t likely to make any meaningful contribution to the Mets.

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