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New York Mets: Examining ten relievers they received in recent trades

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CHICAGO, IL - AUGUST 29: Jacob Rhame #35 of the New York Mets pitches against the Chicago Cubs during the ninth inning at Wrigley Field on August 29, 2018 in Chicago, Illinois. The New York Mets won 10-3. (Photo by Jon Durr/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - AUGUST 29: Jacob Rhame #35 of the New York Mets pitches against the Chicago Cubs during the ninth inning at Wrigley Field on August 29, 2018 in Chicago, Illinois. The New York Mets won 10-3. (Photo by Jon Durr/Getty Images)
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Tyler Bashlor

Tyler Bashlor is the only reliever on this list who wasn’t recently acquired via trade. He was drafted by the Mets in the 11th round of the 2013 draft and projects as a potential middle relief option for 2019.

Bashlor began the 2018 season in Double-A where he threw 24 innings, gave up 7 earned runs (2.63 ERA), struck out 30, and collected 7 saves.

After being called up in late June of 2018, Bashlor did a decent job at the major league level. He threw 32 innings and gave up 15 earned runs (4.22 ERA) while pitching for the Mets.

Bashlor has the stuff to succeed in the Bigs. The right hander’s fastball sits in the mid-90’s and he pairs it with a hard mid-80s curve. He has the ability to strike out big league hitters as much as anyone else in the Mets bullpen.

He’ll have to reign in his high effort delivery in order to control the strike zone better and cash in on his good stuff. He will compete for a middle relief spot during spring training and will undoubtedly be called up at some point in 2019 barring any injury.

Gerson Bautista

Gerson Bautista was one of three relievers (Jamie Callahan and Stephen Nogosek are the others) to come from the Boston Red Sox in exchange for Addison Reed at the 2017 trade deadline. Bautista has perhaps the greatest potential of all the Mets relievers given his impressive tool set.

On the one hand, his numbers are disappointing. Between Double-A and Triple-A he has pitched 49 innings, allowed 28 earned runs (5.14 ERA), and struck out 69.

His short stint in the majors was no better as he threw just 4.1 innings and gave up 6 earned runs (12.46 ERA) before being demoted.

Bautista is a right-handed pitcher with a slender frame but whips his arm fast to generate high-90’s fastballs that regularly touch triple digits, reminiscent of the late Yordano Ventura. Paired with an above average slider, his ability to get strikeouts has never been in doubt.

Bautista’s biggest problem is control. There is no doubt he has the pure stuff to succeed. But, before he can get big league outs, he must reduce his walk rate below the 3.9 BB/9 rate he exhibited in 2018.

Do not expect an immediate improvement in Bautista’s control. But, keep your eyes on him. If he can start locating that big fastball and wipeout slider of his, he’ll be at the back-end of the Mets bullpen in no time.

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