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New York Mets History

Modern New York Mets players who scared the fans plenty

NEW YORK - MAY 09: Oliver Perez #46 of the New York Mets walks to the dugout against the San Francisco Giants at Citi Field on May 9, 2010 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Nick Laham/Getty Images)
NEW YORK - MAY 09: Oliver Perez #46 of the New York Mets walks to the dugout against the San Francisco Giants at Citi Field on May 9, 2010 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Nick Laham/Getty Images)
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Just seeing the names of these former New York Mets is enough to give fans nightmares.

Throughout the years, plenty of New York Mets players have looked more like double-agents than actual men sent to Flushing to help the team win. While there’s no evidence any of them came to New York with the hope of holding the franchise back, the performance still says otherwise.

In honor of Halloween, the most frightening day of the year other than an awkward birthday or wedding you’ve been trying to avoid, this is a list of the most terrifying Mets players of the modern era. Sure to send a chill down many spines, these names are not for the faint of heart.

Oliver Perez

When the Mets acquired lefty Oliver Perez in 2006, things got off to a rocky start immediately. In his 7 starts, Perez went 1-3 with a 6.38 ERA.

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We should have expected this. Perez was awful with the Pittsburgh Pirates. In the 15 starts he made for them prior to the deal, Ollie was 2-10 with a 6.63 ERA. Potential apparently outweighed the present.

The next year, Perez did pitch better. He went 15-10 with a 3.56 ERA in 29 starts. The following year was closer to average with a 10-7 record and 4.22 ERA.

Unfortunately, the Mets thought this was good enough to re-sign the young lefty during the offseason. Children and pregnant women, stop reading now.

Perez signed a three-year deal with the Mets which would pay him $12 million in each season. In today’s MLB, it’s good money. Back then, it was even better.

How did Perez do? In 2009, he went 3-4 with a 6.82 ERA. He averaged 7.9 walks per nine innings.

The following year, split between the starting rotation and bullpen, Ollie went 0-5 with a 6.80 ERA. Somehow, his walk ratio got even worse with an average of 8.2 per nine.

The Mets wisely cut him in the spring of 2011, but not without paying him $36 million to pitch in only 31 miserable games.

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