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New York Mets: Top ten sluggers in franchise history

NEW YORK - APRIL 19: Carlos Delgado #21 of the New York Mets at bat against the Milwaukee Brewers at Citi Field on April 19, 2009 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Nick Laham/Getty Images)
NEW YORK - APRIL 19: Carlos Delgado #21 of the New York Mets at bat against the Milwaukee Brewers at Citi Field on April 19, 2009 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Nick Laham/Getty Images)
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Who is the greatest slugger in New York Mets history? We’ve found the ten best.

Throughout the history of the New York Mets, there have been several big name sluggers to come along and make their mark with the home run ball. Although they don’t have an extensive list of top sluggers, there have routinely been at least a few guys on every squad to put up good power numbers.

Being a “top slugger” requires more than just hitting home runs. While it’s a large sum of the parts, doubles, total bases, and slugging percentage are numbers to look at, too.

As a team that often won early on with their pitching, the Mets waited quite a while before finally discovering the power a home run threat in the middle of a lineup can provide. Ever since, we’ve been treated to plenty. Based on the numbers and the consistency they provided, these ten stand above the rest.

10) Bobby Bonilla

Not many names send shivers down an account’s spine as much as Bobby Bonilla’s does. Best known for his never-ending contract with the Mets, he’s actually one of the better power hitters they have employed.

In parts of five seasons with the Mets, Bonilla hit 95 home runs and put up a slugging percentage of .495. The latter statistic is the more notable one as it ranks him sixth all-time in the franchise’s history.

Bonilla’s best power season with the Mets as a home run hitter came in 1993 when he slugged 34 home runs. However, in the 80 games he played for them in 1995, he posted a better slugging percentage at .599. A midseason trade to the Baltimore Orioles cut his tenure with the Mets short in this particular season, leaving him with 18 home runs in the half-year he spent in New York.

During the 515 games he played under the orange and blue’s management, Bonilla came just shy of triple-digits in home runs and doubles. Given a little more time, he would have surely crossed both thresholds.

Maybe then we wouldn’t think of his so negatively.

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