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New York Mets closer options to consider for the 2019 MLB season

BOSTON, MA - JULY 29: Craig Kimbrel #46 of the Boston Red Sox looks for the catcher's sign against the Minnesota Twins in the ninth inning at Fenway Park on July 29, 2018 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Jim Rogash/Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - JULY 29: Craig Kimbrel #46 of the Boston Red Sox looks for the catcher's sign against the Minnesota Twins in the ninth inning at Fenway Park on July 29, 2018 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Jim Rogash/Getty Images)
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Mets
Mets

Internal

Maybe the next Mets closer is already with the organization. As unlikely as it is, maybe they forego reaching outside the organization.

Robert Gsellman

Following the Familia trade, Robert Gsellman saw some action as the team’s closer. While in the role, he proved to be effective. He completed the year with 13 total saves and a 4.28 ERA.

Throughout 2018, Gsellman took on just about every role one could ask of from a reliever. Used as a closer, setup man, and long-man, the guy did fill every open job without complaint. Despite multiple favorable numbers, he somehow ended the season with a -0.3 WAR. I and everyone else incapable of fully understanding the statistic are dumbfounded. For me, you may be able to even remove “founded.”

Gsellman certainly seems to have the grit to become a closer at some point. Clearly no longer bound for a starting job, the Mets may choose to groom him a little more in the earlier innings before handing him any permanency in the ninth inning.

Anthony Swarzak

Far less exciting than seeing Gsellman in the closer role, we may see the Mets force veteran reliever Anthony Swarzak into the ninth inning. Even when things were going well for Gsellman as the closer, Swarzak got his shot to earn saves.

The 2018 campaign wasn’t a very memorable one for Swarzak; unless of course all of your memories are bad ones. He ended the year with an ERA higher than Jason Vargas for crying out loud. There’s no excuse for this.

The only positive takeaway from Swarzak’s first year with the Mets is how well he struck out opposing hitters. However, the sample size is quite small. He failed to reach the 30-inning mark in a year that should have included many big outs with him on the mound. Instead, the season was a wash for Swarzak who spent more time on the disabled list than he did anywhere else. Surely a weak choice, it wouldn’t shock me to see him as the selection.

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