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Mets: Four questions about Harper, deGrom, Realmuto, and more

NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 21: Bryce Harper #34 of the Washington Nationals celebrates his first inning two run home run with teammate Wilmer Difo #1 as Rene Rivera #44 of the New York Mets looks on at Citi Field on April 21, 2017 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 21: Bryce Harper #34 of the Washington Nationals celebrates his first inning two run home run with teammate Wilmer Difo #1 as Rene Rivera #44 of the New York Mets looks on at Citi Field on April 21, 2017 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
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I never hear any talk about Joe Cavallaro. Is he considered a prospect? -@jerrycolfer

One reason for Joe Cavallaro not being talked about is because while he’s good, everyone else is also good. There might not be much to distinguish himself above other pitchers in the minors.

In Colombia alone, the Mets have had five pitchers so far with an ERA below 2.5 this season. That’s an impressive number but in reality it’s over-saturated. By a lot.

If the rest of the team was doing okay ans this guy was putting up great numbers, than it would be a different story. When you’re that low in the minors, it’s much more difficult to prove that any one player is great or how much better one player is than another.

This is especially true when you’re constantly changing levels and playing in different stadiums, environments, weathers. If a pitcher plays in Binghamton and then plays in Las Vegas, the stats will most likely be very different and wouldn’t really be accurate when measuring actual talent.

That brings up the question as to why are so many pitchers doing so well? Are these pitchers really this good? Are the rest of the leagues hitters simply bad? Are they pitching in a pitchers friendly ballpark or environment?

There are so many factors in the minors that constantly change our perception of whether a player is good, bad, lucky, or unlucky.

As Joe and the others on the sub 2.5 ERA list go through different levels, their stats are going to change. Take St. Lucie for example, in five starts, Joe’s ERA is above 5.

In reality, with so many pitchers who are so close together in terms of stats, you would really need a remarkable achievement in order to highlight one player. This is why some of the others aren’t talked about either.

Let's hire a manager tomorrow. Next

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If everyone on a team was to have an ERA of 2, then it wouldn’t really be noteworthy. If he can continue the dominance at different levels over the next year or two, then people are going to start talking about him and he’d slowly become more relevant, instead of just one in a crowd.

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