Fansided
Rising Apple
New York Mets History

New York Mets uniform numbers the franchise should consider retiring

apercoco
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 28: Dwight Gooden #16 of the 1986 New York Mets greets fans on the red carpet before the game between the New York Mets and the Los Angeles Dodgers at Citi Field on May 28, 2016 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City.The New York Mets are honoring the 30th anniversary of the 1986 championship season. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 28: Dwight Gooden #16 of the 1986 New York Mets greets fans on the red carpet before the game between the New York Mets and the Los Angeles Dodgers at Citi Field on May 28, 2016 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City.The New York Mets are honoring the 30th anniversary of the 1986 championship season. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
facebooktwitterreddit
5 of 8
Mets
Mets

The Sleeper Pick

#20: Howard Johnson

Until 1984, the Mets had 79 players play third base. That position was a constant revolving door until Howard Johnson and Ray Knight were acquired.

Howard Johnson was acquired for Walt Terrell before the 1984 season and was a part-time player for a few seasons. Ray Knight was also acquired later in the 1984 season, replacing Hubie Brooks at third. Brooks was traded that offseason in the blockbuster deal that brought back Gary Carter.

Knight struggled terribly in 1985, and Howard Johnson did as well. Knight turned it around in 1986 and not only batted .298 with huge game-winning home runs during the season, he was the World Series MVP. Johnson was still a part-time player at that point, but that would change in 1987.

Ray Knight was offered a contract to stay with the Mets, but the Baltimore Orioles offered a bit more. He left for the Orioles, a decision he regrets to this day. Johnson, however, became the everyday third baseman, and hit 36 homers that year, and became a fan favorite.

In 1991 he hit 38 home runs and knocked in 117 RBI, which led the league. Injuries plagued him throughout the rest of his career and left the Mets in 1993. He played a few more seasons in Colorado, but his legacy still lives on as a Met.

Hojo came back and became the batting coach for a few seasons and managed in their minor league system. He is also very active on Twitter and has quite the following. However, his number 20 never seems to come up as a number that should be retired, but his numbers as a Met stack up very well among all-time Met greats. He is definitely worthy of a serious discussion.

facebooktwitterreddit