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Mets: Judge rules in Reyes’ favor in child support case

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Aug 28, 2016; New York City, NY, USA; New York Mets shortstop Jose Reyes (7) throws to first against the Philadelphia Phillies during the fifth inning at Citi Field. The Phillies won 5-1. Mandatory Credit: Andy Marlin-USA TODAY Sports
Aug 28, 2016; New York City, NY, USA; New York Mets shortstop Jose Reyes (7) throws to first against the Philadelphia Phillies during the fifth inning at Citi Field. The Phillies won 5-1. Mandatory Credit: Andy Marlin-USA TODAY Sports /
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Off the field issues have continued to plague Jose Reyes.

Update [4.5.17]

After an emotional hearing on Tuesday, the judge ruled in Reyes’ favor, saying that he will continue to pay $11,500 a month. Reyes was not present at the hearing, but both sides are set to go back to court for a final decision.

Original [3.14.17]
Mets infielder Jose Reyes is being sued for allegedly not paying enough child support. The plaintiff in the case, Christina Sanchez, is suing on behalf of their 7-year-old daughter.

"Sanchez’s lawyer, Steven Gildin told the New York Daily News that they “can sue for child support, but the law doesn’t allow us to sue Reyes for not being a good parent to his child. We are suing for financial support, but it would be nice if Christina’s child did not have to grow up without a daddy.”"

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The lawsuit states that Reyes is currently not paying the owed 17 percent of his income in child support, but his lawyer disagrees.

“We are confident that when all of the evidence comes out, it will show that our client has more than met his obligations,” Eric S. Solotoff, Reyes’ lawyer added in a comment to the New York Post. “It is unfortunate that the other side has chosen to deal with this in this manner.”

This isn’t Reyes first issue off the field. Back in late 2015 he was arrested in Maui, Hawaii on a domestic violence dispute. His wife, the victim of the alleged abuse, did not cooperate with investigators so the case was ultimately dropped.

Major League Baseball decided to suspend the then-member of the Colorado Rockies anyway arguing that disciplinary action doesn’t have to be tied to a criminal conviction. He’d serve a 52-game suspension without pay before being released by Colorado and picked up by the Mets in the summer of 2016.

Next: Mike Piazza is excited about the 2017 team

The Mets haven’t issued any comment on Reyes’ current situation as of yet.

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